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Thread: Can I eliminate oil from boxed cake mix?

  1. #1

    Can I eliminate oil from boxed cake mix?

    I'm going to make ice cream cone cupcakes for my daughters class for her birthday. I'm using this recipe from Betty Crocker:

    Ice Cream Cone Cupcakes

    A few of the reviewers said that if the cupcake cones were made the day before, the cones were soggy the next day. I will be making them the night before. As a solution, one reviewer suggested eliminating oil from the recipe altogether and that she's always had great success.

    What's the consensus here on the elimination of oil? These will be eaten by 5 year old kids. They don't have to be the most scrumptious cupcakes ever baked, but I don't want soggy cones either.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Are you planning on replacing the oil with something else?? I think it would be extremely dry if you don't use or replace the oil with something else.

  3. #3
    I would sub applesauce for the oil and cut down on the liquid in the recipe. I have also used pound cake in order to have a denser cake.

  4. #4
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    I've made cupcake like that and the cones lost most of their crunch. I wouldn't have called them soggy -- they didn't loose shape or mush when you picked them up. I'm not sure if you can avoid that, but I did make them the morning of to minimize it. I think I've read those comments from others.

    I've subbed applesauce for oil in a cake mix. The texture of the cake is a bit lighter, but has always been good. I would strain the applesauce so you aren't adding more water (I don't always but would here because of the concern on the cones). However, as long as the cake is more moist than the crispy cones, I think they will tend to get softer (like they do with ice cream in them). I've never left the oil out without a sub for it. I'd be afraid you would have to make the cake really dry to avoid the problem -- which would be worse for eating in my book than the cups being soft. I like crunchy cones, but I wouldn't bother eating dry cake.

    I brush pizza dough with olive oil to keep it from getting soggy in the middle under the sauce and toppings -- I don't know if a light spray of oil (non stick oil coating) would give enough of a barrier to make any difference. Another thing you could try is to put the cones in the oven just long enough to dry them out good but not toast them.

    If you try something that seems to help, let us know.

  5. #5
    I know with a pie crust, you can brush it with egg whites then bake it a bit to keep it from getting soggy. I wonder if that would work here. If you brushed the insides of the cones with beaten egg whites, cooked them in the oven at a low temp so they dry out completely and cook. Maybe then they wouldn't get soggy.

    I've never done it, just thinking it might work.

  6. #6
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    You can sub applesauce for the oil.
    Or, if you are making a chocolate cake, sub pumpkin puree. It works great and adds a little nutrition to the cake too!
    Ana

  7. #7
    I once accidentally baked a cake mix cake without the oil. It came out extremely dry. After googling, the solution I came up with was to douse it in simple syrup, which I did. It was actually fine.

    I would agree with just reducing the amount of oil, in your case

  8. #8
    Haven't read the recipe, but another idea - why don't you melt chocolate and line the inside of the cones with chocolate? I would think that would keep the cones from getting soggy. But if you bake the cakes inside the cones, that won't work

  9. #9
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    Last week I made some tiramisu cupcakes and subbed vanilla yogurt for the oil & one would never know.

  10. #10
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    I don't think its just the oil the makes them soggy - any moisture from the cupcakes will make them soft.

    The best way to avoid the soggyness if you want to bake ahead is to just bake a sheet cake and then use a cookie cutter to cut out circles to put in the cones closer to the time of the party. You can even place some candy at the bottom of the cone as a surprise.

    These cupcakes can be a challenge to transport - you need to make something that you can cut holes in or use lots of foil to support. They are easy to serve and kids love them.

  11. #11
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    The cone going soft is more likely from the hot cake steaming inside as it cools - the cake is sealed in pretty tight being bake in the cone. Try poking a small hole or two in the bottom of the cone to let the steam escape.

    Otherwise, DanaSD had a great suggestion (especially with hiding some candy bits in the bottom)!
    Joe

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    http://desertculinary.blogspot.com/

    Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. ~Judith Viorst

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DanaSD View Post
    I don't think its just the oil the makes them soggy - any moisture from the cupcakes will make them soft.

    The best way to avoid the soggyness if you want to bake ahead is to just bake a sheet cake and then use a cookie cutter to cut out circles to put in the cones closer to the time of the party. You can even place some candy at the bottom of the cone as a surprise.

    These cupcakes can be a challenge to transport - you need to make something that you can cut holes in or use lots of foil to support. They are easy to serve and kids love them.
    I agree with this post. Bake it as a sheet cake and put the cake inside afterwards

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