Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Chewy gingerbread, like a brownie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    North TX
    Posts
    585

    Chewy gingerbread, like a brownie

    For some reason, I have my taste buds set for a chewy gingerbread, with a moist brownie-like texture, that is dark, not too sweet, and very spicy. +/- a lemon glaze for the holidays.

    I have not achieved this with the last two recipes I tried. The second was a true failure--bitter, salty, gritty, eek. I had looked forward to it for dessert. It will be taking a trip to the composter. The first, cakey, great flavor, but too fluffy for me. This one was the recent pub on 101 cookbooks blog.

    I don't think this brownie idea is a common form of gingerbread, but, just in case, anyone out there with ideas or recipes?

    Alternatively, what things vary between cake-like and fudge-like brownies? Is it number of eggs and amount of leavening? I would work on adapting the recipe to see if I can get the cake-like one to be more "fudgy".

  2. #2
    I was just going to ask a sort of related question when I saw yours…

    Glancing thru a Cooks Illustrated while standing in a line earlier today – they had a profile of GB cookies and why some are so tasteless. The verdict was that a cookie such as this would be dry if there was less than X tablespoons amount of fat per cup of flour. Rolling thin would make crisp cookies and thick would make chewy. They claimed their recipe (of course) made the ultimate GB cookies w/ the perfect texture. It all had to do w/ ratio of fat to flour.

    So now I need someone to please post the CI recipe for GB cookies! It was in the special holiday issue that has the reindeer on the cover. Pretty please so we can do a scientific test of our own?? I promise to do a review, too!
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  3. #3

    Lebkuchen Bars

    You might try these-they are a nicely spiced bar and one I have made often over the years.

    A Christmas favorite in our home.
    Lebkuchen Bars
    1 tsp cinnamon
    l teaspoon ground allspice
    1/4 tsp ground cloves
    1/2 tsp salt
    2 1/2 c unsifted flour
    1/2 tsp baking powder
    1/2 c ground almonds
    1 tsp grated lemon rind
    2 eggs
    3/4 c sugar
    3/4 c honey
    1/2 c milk
    Almond Glaze
    1 c confectioner's sugar
    1/2 tsp almond extract
    1 tsp rum
    1-2T water
    Sift together spices, salt, flour, and baking powder. Stir in the almonds and lemon rind. In a separate bowl beat the eggs and sugar until a ribbon forms when the beater is removed. Stir in the honey and milk. Gradually stir in the flour mixture and beat until smooth. Spread the batter in an 11x17" greased jelly roll pan. Bake in a preheated 400° oven for12-15 minutes until the cake is done. While still warm turn the cake out onto a rack. Mix the confectioner's sugar, almond extract, rum and water. Beat until it is smooth and of a glaze consistency, adding more water if necessary. Spread on warm cake. Cut into bars while still warm.
    Yields: 2-3 dozen.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Eastern Shore of MD
    Posts
    1,899
    I've become quite fond of the Food52 website these days, and found this recipe there which specifically talks about a brownie-like consistency.

    And this recipe which also mentions non-cakey gingerbread.

    Yum. Now I want to go bake some!
    There cannot be a crisis today. My schedule is already full.
    -Henry Kissinger

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Peachtree City,GA
    Posts
    980
    For Rosen---

    Gingerbread Cookies Worth Eating

    The Problem

    Most gingerbread cookies are hard and dry, a good choice for hanging on the tree but the last choice left on the Christmas cookie tray.

    The Goal

    A perfect recipe for thick, moist, gently chewy gingerbread cookies that would be the first to leave the cookie tray.

    The Solution

    The first thing we did to remedy the problem of the stiff, dry cookie was to add more butter. A ratio of anything less than 4 tablespoons of fat to 1 cup of flour produced a very dry cookie--which may be what's wanted when building a gingerbread house but is not desirable in a cookie meant for eating. More sugar and molasses came next, making the cookies more flavorful, pleasantly sweet, and moist. A little bit of milk leant the cookies just the right extra measure of softness and lift. Then we discovered that by merely rolling the dough thinner, we could also produce a tasty thin cookie that held up on the Christmas tree. Now, whether thick or thin, we had a cookie that tasted as good as it looked.

    Thin, Crisp Gingerbread Cookies

    Why this recipe works:

    When developing a gingerbread cookie recipe for cookies sturdy enough to hang on the Christmas tree, we discovered that by merely rolling our thick and chewy gingerbread cookie dough thinner, we could produce a tasty thin and crisp cookie.
    Makes about twenty 5-inch gingerbread people

    These gingersnap-like cookies are sturdy and therefore suitable for making ornaments. If you wish to thread the cookies, snip wooden skewers to 1/2-inch lengths and press them into the cookies just before they go into the oven; remove skewers immediately after baking. Or, use a drinking straw to punch holes in the cookies when they're just out of the oven and still soft. Store in an airtight container. In dry climates, the cookies should keep about a month.
    Ingredients

    3cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    3/4cup packed dark brown sugar
    1tablespoon ground cinnamon
    1tablespoon ground ginger
    1/2teaspoon ground cloves
    1/2teaspoon table salt
    3/4teaspoon baking soda
    12tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), cut into 12 pieces and softened slightly
    3/4cup unsulphured molasses
    2tablespoons milk

    Instructions

    1. In food processor workbowl fitted with steel blade, process flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt, and baking soda until combined, about 10 seconds. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture and process until mixture is sandy and resembles very fine meal, about 15 seconds. With machine running, gradually add molasses and milk; process until dough is evenly moistened and forms soft mass, about 10 seconds. Alternatively, in bowl of standing mixer fitted with paddle attachment, stir together flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt, and baking soda at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Stop mixer and add butter pieces; mix at medium-low speed until mixture is sandy and resembles fine meal, about 1 1/2 minutes. Reduce speed to low and, with mixer running, gradually add molasses and milk; mix until dough is evenly moistened, about 20 seconds. Increase speed to medium and mix until thoroughly combined, about 10 seconds.

    2. Scrape dough onto work surface; divide into quarters. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll 1/8-inch thick between two large sheets of parchment paper. Leaving dough sandwiched between parchment layers, stack on cookie sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 minutes. (Alternatively, refrigerate dough 2 hours or overnight.)

    3. Adjust oven racks to upper- and lower-middle positions and heat oven to 325 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

    4. Remove one dough sheet from freezer; place on work surface. Peel off top parchment sheet and gently lay it back in place. Flip dough over; peel off and discard second parchment layer. Cut dough into 5-inch gingerbread people or 3-inch gingerbread cookies, transferring shapes to parchment-lined cookie sheets with wide metal spatula, spacing them 3/4 inch apart; set scraps aside. Repeat with remaining dough until cookie sheets are full. Bake cookies until slightly darkened and firm in centers when pressed with finger, about 15 to 20 minutes, rotating cookie sheets front to back and switching positions top to bottom halfway through baking time. Do not overbake. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes, then remove with wide metal spatula to wire rack; cool to room temperature.

    5. Gather scraps; repeat rolling, cutting, and baking in steps 2 and 4. Repeat with remaining dough until all dough is used.
    Alpogoalie: Any dog smart enough to use its paw to pin down a dog dish.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Peachtree City,GA
    Posts
    980

    Part 2---

    Thick and Chewy Gingerbread Cookies

    Why this recipe works:

    Because we wanted a thick and chewy gingerbread cookie recipe, we added more butter for moisture. A ratio of anything less than 4 tablespoons of fat to 1 cup of flour produced a very dry cookie—which may be desirable when building a gingerbread house but not when making a cookie meant for eating. More sugar and molasses came next, adding flavor and a pleasant sweetness. A little bit of milk gave the cookies just the right extra measure of softness and lift.

    Thirty 3-inch cookies

    If you plan to decorate your gingerbread cookies and make ornaments out of them, follow the related recipe for Thin, Crisp Gingerbread Cookies. Because flour is not added during rolling, dough scraps can be rolled and cut as many times as necessary Don't overbake the cookies or they will be dry. Store soft gingerbread in a wide, shallow airtight container or tin with a sheet of parchment or waxed paper between each cookie layer. These cookies are best eaten within one week. If you make gingerbread people, this recipe will make about twenty 3-inch people.
    Ingredients

    3cups unbleached all-purpose flour
    3/4cup packed dark brown sugar
    1tablespoon ground cinnamon
    1tablespoon ground ginger
    1/2teaspoon ground cloves
    1/2teaspoon table salt
    3/4teaspoon baking soda
    12tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), cut into 12 pieces and softened slightly
    3/4cup unsulphured molasses
    2tablespoons milk

    Instructions

    1. In food processor workbowl fitted with steel blade, process flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt, and baking soda until combined, about 10 seconds. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture and process until mixture is sandy and resembles very fine meal, about 15 seconds. With machine running, gradually add molasses and milk; process until dough is evenly moistened and forms soft mass, about 10 seconds. Alternatively, in bowl of standing mixer fitted with paddle attachment, stir together flour, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, salt, and baking soda at low speed until combined, about 30 seconds. Stop mixer and add butter pieces; mix at medium-low speed until mixture is sandy and resembles fine meal, about 1 1/2 minutes. Reduce speed to low and, with mixer running, gradually add molasses and milk; mix until dough is evenly moistened, about 20 seconds. Increase speed to medium and mix until thoroughly combined, about 10 seconds.

    2. Scrape dough onto work surface; divide in half. Working with one portion of dough at a time, roll 1/4-inch thick between two large sheets of parchment paper. Leaving dough sandwiched between parchment layers, stack on cookie sheet and freeze until firm, 15 to 20 minutes. (Alternatively, refrigerate dough 2 hours or overnight.)

    3. Adjust oven racks to upper- and lower-middle positions and heat oven to 350 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper.

    4. Remove one dough sheet from freezer; place on work surface. Peel off top parchment sheet and gently lay it back in place. Flip dough over; peel off and discard second parchment layer. Cut dough into 5-inch gingerbread people or 3-inch gingerbread cookies, transferring shapes to parchment-lined cookie sheets with wide metal spatula, spacing them 3/4 inch apart; set scraps aside. Repeat with remaining dough until cookie sheets are full. Bake cookies until set in centers and dough barely retains imprint when touched very gently with fingertip, 8 to 11 minutes, rotating cookie sheets front to back and switching positions top to bottom halfway through baking time. Do not overbake. Cool cookies on sheets 2 minutes, then remove with wide metal spatula to wire rack; cool to room temperature.

    5. Gather scraps; repeat rolling, cutting, and baking in steps 2 and 4. Repeat with remaining dough until all dough is used.
    Alpogoalie: Any dog smart enough to use its paw to pin down a dog dish.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    6,488
    My family's gingersnaps have that kind of consistency (chewy not fudgy which is how I like my brownies), in a cookie. Never tried baking as a bar.

    Laura’s Gingersnaps
    (That would be my Great Grandma Laura on my mom’s side)

    1 1/2 cups shortening (I have subbed lard in which case use a little less lard)
    2 cups sugar
    2 eggs
    1/2 cup dark molasses
    4 cups flour (scooped)
    2 t cloves
    2 t ground ginger
    2 t cinnamon
    1 t salt
    2 t baking soda
    Additional sugar for rolling–coarseness is up to you

    Preheat the oven to 375 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silicone (or grease if you prefer).

    Cream the shortening and sugar together. Add the eggs and molasses and beat until well combined.

    Meanwhile, whisk together all of the dry ingredients, including the spices. Add to the wet mixture and mix until just combined. These cookies can be made any size–just bake longer for bigger cookies. Scoop out the size of cookie you want and roll it in the sugar; we have always used granulated white sugar, but as an adult I have successfully experimented with sanding sugar, turbinado, and coarse decorating sugar. Place on the cookie sheet; repeat until the sheet is filled, keeping dough about 2 inches apart. Bake for 11-13 minutes for smaller cookies, longer for larger.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    North TX
    Posts
    585
    Thanks for helping me with this delicious problem! I thought it was a rather wacky questions, but the BB always comes through with a bunch of good ideas. I'll have to continue the quest for my perfect gingerbread--and try that lebkutchen, too, which sounds amazing.

  9. #9
    Mary Ann, thank you!! This will be my project today and should prove to be an interesting experiment as I have neither a large FP nor a stand mixer. It will depend on old fashioned cutting in by hand. Gotta burn those taste testing calories some how!

    MinEaston - that's an interesting recipe, too that will be tried soon.

    Our favorite ginger cookie came from this BB and it's either thin & crisp or thin & chewy depending on how long they're baked. But the dough does not lend itself to rolling and cutting at all.

    The house is going to smell wonderful this afternoon!
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  10. #10
    This may be *almost* what you are looking for, a recipe for brownies, not cookies.

    http://chocolatechillimango.com/2011...-mit-marzipan/
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

  11. #11
    Reporting back on the CI GB cookies. I opted for the thicker version and had no problems w/ the mixing by hand. Followed the recipe to the letter - although I lacked enough unsalted butter and used 4 T of salted. All spices used were fresh Penzey's.

    Hmmm - conflicting verdict. Being thick, they puffed and lost the crisp shape of the 3 simple cutters I used. (The thin version may hold shapes a bit better??) The flavor and chewy texture are good... but I'm still looking for a more pronounced flavor. I need "umph" in my GB and these are an 8 on a scale of 1-10.

    I was going to do a few details on them using a simple lemon glaze - but think I'll just leave them plain as they look more like lumps than the cat, dog and holly leaf they were intended to be. Ha! Which leads me to say... these really don't need to be cut outs. The bits of end scraps got hand formed into 2 balls that I just slightly smacked flat. Those 2 came out as perfect drop looking cookies. The dough would need still need to be chilled for a bit as it does soften quickly.

    Now the next project is for those lovely bars from Food 52. That site has a lot to offer!

    Thanks for letting me slightly hijack this post - although it lead to some interesting recipes!
    "I can read and write if that's what you mean. I'm not thick or anything just don't ask me where the commas go."
    Incendiary by Chris Cleave

  12. #12
    I'm a little confused as to quite what you're looking for, but these cookies are great. They are very nicely chewy and with crystallized ginger in the recipe, they have a nice gingery bite. I'm not a huge ginger cookie fan, but I LOVE these. Yum.

    Don't let the "snap" in the name put you off - they are definitely a chewy cookie.

    http://savorynotebook.blogspot.com/2...ger-snaps.html

    Aw man, now I want to bake some.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by lindrusso View Post
    I'm a little confused as to quite what you're looking for...
    I'm confused, too. At first, I thought it was a Brownie, but when I read the OP again, I see it could be Gingerbread, a Brownie, or a glazed cookie, but *probably* not a Gingersnap,
    The cardiologist's diet: - If it tastes good spit it out!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •