Community Message Boards
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 52

Thread: Low carb? Low Fat? How do you choose your diet?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    One Particular Harbour
    Posts
    2,375

    Low carb? Low Fat? How do you choose your diet?

    [And by diet, I mean eating plan, not a "I have to lose 5 pounds" diet]

    I keep thinking about this thread, which has evolved into a kind of discussion about low fat versus low carb diets.

    http://community.cookinglight.com/sh...d.php?t=140914

    In order not to sidetrack the original thread, I wanted to start a new one.

    Wallycat gave some great information on her low-carb diet. I think, correct me if I'm wrong, that you adopted that diet to counteract your hypoglycemic tendencies? Or did you also want to lose weight and/or bring down cholesterol or BP?

    I definitely think that eating a lot of simple sugars is not good. But I still have the mindset that having WW pasta with a veggie sauce would still be an okay diet. I find it hard to think that chickpeas or black beans have no place in a low-carb diet, for example.

    So what is your experience with either of these diets? My personal goal is to eat for long term heart health. I am at a good weight now, and my numbers are good, so it is hard for me, with no obvious incentives, to change my diet. I think I eat pretty good, as far as a traditional heart-healthy diet, although I do eat too many simple carbs.

    My DH is on the Paleo diet, to lose weight. He does pretty well on it and doesn't really miss carbs except for the occasional pizza. If I could I would make a pasta with some kind of sauteed spinach/cannellini bean/mozzarella cheese concoction for dinner every night because I find that creative (to use up wwhat's in the fridge), I enjoy it and my kids will eat it!

    So what can you tell me about your diet? Do you eat to maintain heart health, lose weight, etc? Low fat? Vegan? Low carb? Flexitarian?
    Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by BucknellAlum View Post
    [And by diet, I mean eating plan, not a "I have to lose 5 pounds" diet]

    I keep thinking about this thread, which has evolved into a kind of discussion about low fat versus low carb diets.

    http://community.cookinglight.com/sh...d.php?t=140914

    In order not to sidetrack the original thread, I wanted to start a new one.

    Wallycat gave some great information on her low-carb diet. I think, correct me if I'm wrong, that you adopted that diet to counteract your hypoglycemic tendencies? Or did you also want to lose weight and/or bring down cholesterol or BP?

    I definitely think that eating a lot of simple sugars is not good. But I still have the mindset that having WW pasta with a veggie sauce would still be an okay diet. I find it hard to think that chickpeas or black beans have no place in a low-carb diet, for example.

    So what is your experience with either of these diets? My personal goal is to eat for long term heart health. I am at a good weight now, and my numbers are good, so it is hard for me, with no obvious incentives, to change my diet. I think I eat pretty good, as far as a traditional heart-healthy diet, although I do eat too many simple carbs.

    My DH is on the Paleo diet, to lose weight. He does pretty well on it and doesn't really miss carbs except for the occasional pizza. If I could I would make a pasta with some kind of sauteed spinach/cannellini bean/mozzarella cheese concoction for dinner every night because I find that creative (to use up wwhat's in the fridge), I enjoy it and my kids will eat it!

    So what can you tell me about your diet? Do you eat to maintain heart health, lose weight, etc? Low fat? Vegan? Low carb? Flexitarian?
    I choose Weight Watrchers which is well balanced. It does focus on complex carbs or "clean foods." I tended to hypoglycemia since my first child - had to have protein first thing in the day or pay with low blood sugar shakes. IMy palate does much prefer proteins for snacks. My problem now is I do get gout and should probably go vegan.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    For me, the switch occurred when I had my first fasting glucose that was prediabetic. Totally freaked out; I was 41. I "ate well" and I exercised 2 hours daily. I had a BMI of 19 and in theory, looked the picture of health. Since my 20's I had been battling reactive hypoglycemia, which I did not understand till I went to school to get my RD degree. Sadly, in school, we were continually taught low-fat/high whole grain/low meat. I was vegetarian for many years...when I met DH, I added fish and maybe some chicken every month.
    I learned to LOVE to eat this way and if I touched a 2% fat yogurt, I felt I was eating butter....and did not like it.
    Fast forward to the pre-diabetic dx.
    I tried to include whole grains and more soy protein things just so I could find something to eat and not get my glucose to be all over the map. That worked for a while and my fasting glucose came down.
    Fast forward to turning 50...I interviewed for a job with a wellness doctor and oddly, he asked me if I had ever read Gary Taubes' book "good calories; bad calories." I had not.
    I did not know if I would get the job but the title stuck with me.
    My love of all things science and nutrition --and food ...I got the book.
    Funnily enough, this wellness doc is very much into the China Study book and they eat a lot of whole grain and vegetarian type meals, but thankfully, he had an open mind. I finished the book in 3 days. Devoured it.
    It changed my life.
    I did end up getting the job (sadly laid off due to economic crap) but that book altered the course of how I feel.
    I was not trying to lose weight, although I do need to (medicine induced and probably aging)...sadly Taubes talks about hormones and how they affect weight gain and that some people, even if they do the low carb diet properly, may never see a drop in weight. The first 3 days were not pleasant. I figured, as I told my patients...I can stick out anything for AT LEAST 30 days. So I did.
    For the FIRST TIME IN MY LIFE...I did not have reactive hypoglycemia.
    I was able to leave the house without a shopping bag of food to eat from every 45 minutes.
    I had always had good lipid profiles, and these continue.
    No high BP and still none.
    Wish I could get to my BMI of 19, but I fear that ship has sailed.
    My fasting glucose has come down ...not huge amounts, but down is down. I feel that since this number is so hard to budge for me, if I had maintained my whole grain "healthy" diet, I would probably have burned out my pancreas in my early 40s and become type 2 diabetic. My mother had it so there is genetic predisposition.

    I find shopping easier, meal planning easier and the fact that all I need is a small bag of nuts to tide me over should I get hungry --even if I am gone all day....PRICELESS!!!
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,505
    Personally I have tried several different "lifestyle" changes that ruled out or cut back on carbs or fats or the way you mix them together. And I always quit.

    I have had good luck with weight watchers as it is a more normal way for my lifestyle and the way I have always eaten. I have lost quite a bit of weight on it and while I gain back some by "turning brain off and eating whatever I see" I always come back. For me it works because while I don't mind limiting some things I would obsess over something I was told I could not have...
    It works on a balanced diet premise with complex carbohydrates or "filling" foods being recommended.
    EmptyNestMom
    Grandma Pam to 3


    No matter how long the winter, spring is sure to follow.-Proverbs

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,155
    Wild fish, fowl, and game, whole grains, low fat dairy, lots of fruit and vegetables, not much sugar and as little salt as I can stand. I try and avoid processed food as much as possible. My back was really bad for a couple years and I couldn't get much exercise and ended up putting on a lot of weight. I followed Atkins for a year and got back to my normal weight.
    Anne

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    One Particular Harbour
    Posts
    2,375
    So wallycat, it seems like you changed your diet primarily for the glucose issue. That is funny, I have had pretty low fasting glucose, not high, but I do feel awful if I have say a bowl of plain Cheerios for breakfast. (When I was a kid, that was touted as the best breakfast ever due to the low # of sugars). My dad is a T1 diabetic so I am vary familiar with the concept of glucose spikes and drops.

    Would you recommend this diet to someone who wants to improve their lipids? I think I mentioned my mom has to keep her C reactive P down and I keep trying to tell her that sugar/carbs cause inflammation and she should limit them. She is still thinking just about cutting calories to lose weight (which is not necessarily a bad thing) but it might be easier on her if she eat more fat to feel full instead of filling up on carbs.

    I have read Taube's work in the NYT magazine, I think. Then I read something else that also makes sense. Perhaps diet is not one size fits all. (no pun intended)

    Last week's magazine was how yo-yo dieting actually changes the chemicals in your body and makes it even harder to lost weight. They have shown that in the labs now. It is better to prevent weight gain, just like it is better to prevent heart disease!
    Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

  7. #7
    Since December 27, we have been eating Primal at my house. It seems to be very close to Paleo, but allows some dairy and nuts. No grains, no sugar. Lots of fat and lots of protein, and I'm trying to keep my carbs under 50 g per day. For example, yesterday I ate about 1500 calories, 100 gr of fat, 90 gr of protein, and 70 gr of carbs, mostly from vegetables.

    The only thing I have missed is cookies and I have eaten them (homemade... the lesser of the evils!) once a week. Other than that, I've been fine. I'm 5'2", 133 pounds and would like to get down to 125 in the next few months. I don't think this is a fast way to loose weight; it's more of a way to reduce the effects of sugar and grain on your body. I read Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes and it made so much sense to me. This book is supposed to be a more "reader-friendly" version of Good Calories, Bad Calories.

    I've lost two pounds in two weeks, which is huge for me. I am not hungry, don't want to nibble all the time, and don't think about food. It's good!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    If someone has metabolic syndrome or insulin resistance, I cannot imagine low carb NOT working.
    At worst, you can always go back to any meal plan you prefer, but I feel it is worth a shot.
    I lived in Paris for 5 months for work and think back how many times I told them to hold the butter on things. OY --I could kill myself now And French butter, no less!!

    Yes, the crux of this issue is that we all do not process food in the same fashion. Many of us do not process food the same way as we age because our body is simply less forgiving.

    I know someone mentioned Paleo on the other thread and if you start reading through Paleo sites, it makes one wonder how we ever survived starting grains. Frankly, we did not. We got shorter and had many health issues till our lineage adapted to the grain filled/agricultural type diet. If you believe the paleo enthusiasts, our brains got bigger and we got smarter because of the fat, and some protein, that hunter/gatherers ate. We evolved to eat fat and meat. Fruit was a rare occurrence and honey was found only occasionally.
    Our bodies were designed to store fat to survive, but storing fat on fat/protein is harder and once agriculture kicked in, type 2 diabetes increased because the "best survivors" were sadly, the best at storing fat and getting fatter.
    I appreciate that people are different, which is why when I counseled patients, I always asked what they enjoyed eating first before trying to create a meal plan. At some point, you have to give up what you love and try new things if you want results, but you can still build on what you like.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Ouachita Mountains in Northwest Arkansas
    Posts
    1,159
    My DH and I had "milestone" birthdays this year () and decided that we had to improve our health. I joined Weight Watchers in July -- exactly six months ago -- and have lost 40 pounds. My DH has lost 35 basically eating what I'm cooking. I'm so pleased with this plan. And I feel so much better than I've felt in years that for the first time I know I'm in the process of a major lifestyle change. I hadn't been on the Weight Watchers plan in over a decade so I was surprised by it. It's no longer based on calories; it's based on a protein/carb/fat/fiber ratio, and has been easy for both of us. And while we've drastically changed how we eat, nothing is really off limits. We've learned that the splurges are really okay since they're just "now and then."

    Denise
    "If you're lucky enough to live in the mountains, you're lucky enough."

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,780
    I eat low carb by my standards since I've been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. I am not medicated for this. I'm allowed 135gr. of carbs a day. They add up quickly! I don't think I eat that much everyday. My sugar is down to 6! yay! The doc said I'm behaving myself. I eat one slice of Healthy life bread which is 6 carbs with an egg fried in butter for breakfast, lunch is about 4 tablespoons of cottage cheese and dinner is more substantial. Tonight it's Ina's roast chicken with croutons, whipped cauliflower and a salad. Other nights it's a half baked potato with butter and sour cream with a protein and veggie. Cereal? No way! I was craving some Cheerios a couple of months ago and had some for breakfast. Two hours later my sugar was 184! That is way too high. It should be 140 or less after two hours. Bacon, sausage, eggs, breakfast pizza[at school on Tuesday] are the things that I eat for breakfast.

    Bucknell, if you can eat high carb foods, then enjoy yourself. For me any grain is bad for my sugar. I love baked barley, rice, and pasta, but it raises my sugar too much. When i hear BB members talking about beans and rice, I get squirmy inside thinking of all those carbs. Seriously, I do.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Peachtree City,GA
    Posts
    980
    Another Primal household checking in. We made the switch in May for several reasons. My SO's glucose was starting to trend upward and he had just been diagnosed with MS. We read "Why We Get Fat" and "The Primal Blueprint" and thought we'd give it a try for both the glucose and inflammation standpoints. His glucose is now in the the 70s from a high near 100. His triglycerides, which have always been elevated, are now normal.

    The first few weeks were an adjustment, but we love it. We feel great and we've both lost around 30 pounds, but that wasn't even part of the equation initially. The protein/fat combo keeps me full, and we're discovering new veggies. An added bonus is that my SO is now interested in cooking and grilling. YMMV, of course.
    Alpogoalie: Any dog smart enough to use its paw to pin down a dog dish.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    1,598
    I think that given that we each have unique DNA that there are bound to be individual variations in a diet that is optimal for health but I think most Americans need to be concerned about meat, dairy, sugar and processed foods.

    I have been a vegetarian for most of my life, about 30+ years now for ethical reasons. I have refined my diet over the years so that I follow a mostly vegan diet. I have not been good about exercise (mostly due to my non-athlete disposition and foot surgery that caused me to have to give up running) which I have vowed to work on this year. I do yoga, however, which is helpful but certainly not enough. I have always had excellent blood profiles and am told that I look ten years younger than I am often. My LDL is 43 and my HDL is 80 as of last March, I will get new results in a month at work.

    My diet is basically whole grains and beans, tofu and soy, fresh vegetables and fruits (probably too many fruits and fruit juices but I just love 'em), and organic canola oil for baking, EVOO, and avocado for fat. I have eggs from a neighbor who raises chickens on occasion. My temptations are sweets and cheese...I have a bite or two of good blue cheese and bake my own mostly whole grain muffins for my sweet tooth . And I indulge once every month or so on a really good dessert.

    I belive that a vegetarian diet is better for us, better for the planet and certainly better for the animals but I recognize that not everyone feels the same. Nutrition is such a fascinating topic!
    Adopt a shelter cat!
    www.arascolorado.org

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Shawnee, KS
    Posts
    592
    For many years, I tried to follow the typical low-fat diet prescribed by my doctor for my high cholesterol. My numbers continued to climb, and when I hit my 40s, the doctor strongly encouraged me to take statins along with the low-fat diet. Every one I tried made me feel “wonky” – spacey, random muscle aches, I seemed to get sick more often. The doc wrote this off as perimenopause, but now I’m not so sure. I had hepatitis when I was 20, so I was concerned about the possible liver issues with the statins (you have to have your liver enzymes checked every 90 days to be sure you aren’t wrecking your liver).

    About 2 years ago, I told my doctor I wanted to go off the statins and try to manage my cholesterol through lifestyle changes. For 3 months, I followed to the letter a low-fat diet (no cheating), walked 2-3 miles every day, weight training 2-3 times a week. Even though I lost 4 pounds (went from 124 lbs. to 120), my LDLs increased, my HDLs dropped. The doctor prescribed a “new” statin drug. I filled the prescription but never took them, because 3 days later I woke up to acute appendicitis and had to have surgery. (I now believe it was my lowfat diet that caused this – read about this in Gary Taubes’ “Good Calories, Bad Calories” book.) Due to complications, I had a second surgery a week later. Once home, I was so sick of taking medications and doctors, I quit taking all my meds (statins, hormones), and stopped my low-fat diet. After healing from the surgeries, I was amazed at how much better I felt not taking the statin drugs. But my cholesterol numbers were climbing, as well as my weight, and the doctor kept harping at me that I needed to take the statins.

    I was referred by a friend to a new family doctor, who also specializes in Gynecology & Bariatrics. He treats quite a few diabetic patients. He is an advocate of lowcarb eating. I was skeptical that it would work (I wasn’t overweight or diabetic) but willing to give it a try for 90 days. It was very hard to wrap my mind around this way of eating, after all the years of lowfat dieting. But I stuck to it and after just 6 weeks, my cholesterol numbers were improving, I had lost my muffin top around my waist, and most importantly, I felt great!

    I won’t lie, it still is hard to eat lowcarb, even after eating this way for 18 months but it does get easier. I still miss my breads and pasta. Now that my cholesterol numbers have improved, I am eating in “maintenance” mode, which means I can eat higher carb veggies like sweet potatoes or corn, and beans occasionally. I have to be careful with fruit – it raises my triglycerides. I probably eat three times the fat I used to. I eat meat, chicken, fish, eggs, full-fat dairy, lots of vegetables, and a little bit of fruit. I rarely eat any grains – when I do, I feel cruddy the next day, like a carb hangover. My cholesterol numbers are much improved, and I feel great. I’ve only had one slight cold in the past 18 months – I used to be a virus motel, flashing “vacancy” for every one that came along! I rarely get that gnawing hunger that I used to each and every afternoon when I was eating lowfat.

    That’s why I chose my way of eating/diet. Whew!
    Cindi in KC

    "He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose." Jim Elliot (1927-1956)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Posts
    22
    My diet is not really a diet, it's a way of life that I hope I'll stick to for the rest of my life.

    It's based on the Eat-Clean Diet. I do not count calories, and I am not on a strict diet, I allow myself to cheat whenever I want to. Most importantly, this is not a starvation diet, in fact, I eat as much as I want. I am not trying to lose weight, but I do want to lose the 'skinny-fat' be more toned.

    It's hard to stick to it during the holidays, I am really trying to get back on track.
    Community Manager @TrudeauKitchen. Questions? Ask me anything!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    Incase anyone watched the news yesterday....
    Statins in women can up the risk of type 2 diabetes....by as much as 48%.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Madison, WI USA
    Posts
    7,851
    I saw that in the news. Very interesting! DH keeps debating whether or not he should be on statins (family history of heart issues). I want to keep him off of them for as long as possible (since it's a lifetime drug)

    We eat a good well balanced diet (although obviously everyone's definition of well balanced is different). We don't rule out any food groups. I do feel that we eat way too many refined carbs (mostly pasta, cereal & bread). I'd like to reduce that just b/c I know if we're consuming the calories they should probably be veggies (we already do well with veggies, but could be better)

    It's interesting how many people who responded are low carb. It's also interesting that Atkins is out of fashion yet Paleo is in (when they sound similar from afar). I'm really curious to learn the difference between Paleo & Primal. Need to read up on that!

    I do agree that everyone is different, and we also change as we age. Neither DH nor I are overweight, but I do want to ensure lifelong healthy habits. And, while we could both stand to lose 5 pounds, we want to ensure we don't ever hit a situation where we have to lose a ton. We're definitely in the prevention camp.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    Interesting study came out last week that women who were "plump" had better longevity than "thin" women.
    Ha, finally...there is such a thing as being too thin
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,648
    Hi wallycat & others..
    As most of you already know, we eat a mostly vegetarian low fat diet for 30+ years. We exercise a lot and do a lot of outdoor activities so burn thru a lot that way. We eat occasional eggs, chicken and white fish. DH was concerned we didn't get enough protein. Being willing to eat those things makes it less difficult for dinners out. I keep a lid on simple sugars, fruit juices, sweets in general.

    I've been happy, weight stable, and consequently haven't been keeping an eye on all the new diets and approaches that have popped up in the last few years so this has been quite an updating process. I'm surprised to see so many people in low carb programs. We are definitely in the "prevention" camp, or try to be. Not gaining to begin with is a better approach than having to lose a bunch of lbs.

    Saw that about the statins this morning.... DH tried them but did not feel well on them so we are working on figuring out if we can tweak what we currently eat to get his elevated lipid levels down. His levels are a little too high but seem to have climbed in the last year for unclear reasons.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dadeville, AL
    Posts
    12,738
    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    Interesting study came out last week that women who were "plump" had better longevity than "thin" women.
    Ha, finally...there is such a thing as being too thin
    Like! Although, I'm a little (a lot) more than "plump!"
    Kay
    I'm a WYSIWYG person -- no subterfuge here!

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by SusanMac View Post
    It's interesting how many people who responded are low carb. It's also interesting that Atkins is out of fashion yet Paleo is in (when they sound similar from afar). I'm really curious to learn the difference between Paleo & Primal. Need to read up on that!
    I've been learning that as well. It seems to me that Paleo is a little more strict in the foods it allows. No dairy at all! Primal allows for small amounts of full fat dairy as long as it agrees with you. Primal suggests an 80/20 balance: once you reach your weight or health goals, you should be able to maintain them by eating correctly 80% of the time. Primal also focuses on good sleep and stress free (well, as much as that is possible) living.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,780
    Quote Originally Posted by wallycat View Post
    Incase anyone watched the news yesterday....
    Statins in women can up the risk of type 2 diabetes....by as much as 48%.


    HMMM. That's very interesting news. Did it mention the length of time for this to occur? I've been on Lipitor for 11? years, and diagnosed with type 2 for four years. My A1C was 6 in December with no medication .

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    I would take this study with a grain of salt...some previous studies showed no correlation and other studies found the correlation...and it was interesting that lower BMI affected the cause more than higher BMI.
    Of course, the old idea that cholesterol levels matter forces doctors to Rx statins to begin with....but that is a different can of worms

    Here is the study from MedPage:
    Statins Up Diabetes Risk in Older Women

    By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
    Published: January 09, 2012
    Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and
    Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner
    Action Points

    This study found that older women who take statins may be at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes.


    Note that the risk was seen with all types of statins.

    Older women who take statins may be at an increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, researchers found.

    In an analysis of data from the Women's Health Initiative, postmenopausal women who were on a statin at study entry had almost a 50% greater risk of diabetes than those who weren't on the cholesterol-lowering drugs, Yunsheng Ma, MD, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, and colleagues reported online in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

    "This study urges us to further evaluate the risk-benefit profile of statins," Ma told MedPage Today, adding that the ratio will likely vary by patient population.

    Recent research has suggested a potential link between statins and the development of diabetes -- most notably a meta-analysis that found a 9% increased risk of the disease with statin use (QJM 2011; 104(2): 109-124), Ma said.

    Yet how the risk of diabetes with statin use varies across populations hasn't been thoroughly explored, he added. So he and colleagues looked at data from the Women's Health Initiative to assess the risk in postmenopausal women.

    Data were available for 153,840 women, mean age 63, who didn't have diabetes when they were enrolled in the study in 1993. About 7% of them were on statins at that time.

    Through follow-up ending in 2005, there were 10,242 cases of new-onset diabetes.

    In initial analyses, Ma and colleagues found that statin use at baseline was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.61 to 1.83), and that association remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for age, race, and weight (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.59).

    Ma said the risk was seen with all types of statins. "It appears to be a class effect," he told MedPage Today.

    Risks were increased for all ethnicities, although they did vary slightly, with the highest risks seen among Asians:

    White: HR 1.49, 95% CI 1.38 to 1.62
    African American: HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.45
    Hispanic: 1.57, 95% CI 1.14 to 2.17
    Asian: HR 1.78, 95% CI 1.32 to 2.40

    The researchers also found that obesity appeared to be protective against disease; statin use was associated with a higher risk of diabetes in women with a body mass index (BMI) under 25 than in those who had a BMI of 30 or higher.

    They said differences in phenotype, such as weight distribution, may explain the association.

    Risk of diabetes also was similarly elevated -- by about 50% -- for women with and without heart disease, and was similar if women used either high- or low- potency statins (HR 1.45, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.61; and HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.36 to 1.61, respectively).

    "The take-home message is that different populations have different risks for diabetes" associated with statin use, Annie Culver, BPharm, of the University of Massachusetts and a co-author on the study, told MedPage Today. "When a statin is indicated, it's very important to continue to monitor for diabetes as well as for the statin effects, so the dose can be adjusted along the way."

    Culver added that the findings emphasize current guidelines that recommend lifestyle intervention as the primary means of treating high cholesterol.

    "Too many people are put on a statin who don't have to be," Ma said. "Patients should go on a statin if they can't control [their cholesterol] through dietary intervention, but once they're on that statin they should still continue lifestyle intervention."

    Suzanne Steinbaum, MD, director of women and heart disease at Lenox Hill Hospital in Bronx, N.Y., said in an email that it's not yet clear from this one study what the clinical implications are for postmenopausal women on statins.

    "Due to the extensive use of statins in the aging female population, it is critical that more studies are done to help understand the association with statins and the development of diabetes," she wrote. "Women who are taking statins should be aware of the need to check their blood sugars, along with their liver function tests."

    The researchers said the study was limited by its observational nature, and because individual statin analysis may be confounded by the fact that women may have changed statin type before developing diabetes.

    The study was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

    The Women's Health Initiative was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    The researchers reported no conflicts of interest.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  23. #23
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,559
    I don't do diets- I started watching my portions three years ago and enrolled at the gymn. I eat whatever I want, but now I know how much I can eat and still maintain. I have learned to eat really slow which tricked me into believing I was eating a lot. I love ice cream, so I buy the little cups of Hagen Daz. They are always frozen hard out of the freezer. I think it takes 20 minutes for me to dig it out of the cup and by that time I have had more than enough. I remember the time I would eat the whole pint.

    Some people say that you should not get on the scale everyday, but that is my first moring stop. If I see that I have gained two pounds, then I take steps to get it off immediately. The scale is my very best friend and it always tell me the bare truth. It took me 14 months to loose 45 pounds. I weigh 134 pounds now, I feel great; doctor, friends and family say I look great. I kinda think so too

    I boxed up every piece of clothing I owned, including shoes that no longer fit and gifted them to Goodwill.

    I tried almost every diet I can think of: Atkins, Drs. Eades, Low Fat, High Protein, weight watchers, Jenny Craig and many others,

  24. #24
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,648
    DH and I exercise a lot. yesterday we did a hike/snowshoe. not as long as usual but 2.5 hours up and 2 hours back carrying a medium weight pack 20-25 lbs, in 20 degree weather.

    we both get pretty hungry during and after. we had some cheese on crackers, an orange, cup of instant soup, hot chocolate, half a brownie. we often have a bar like Luna too. this is more simple sugars than our daily fare but seems to be what works and is portable.
    those of you who are low carbers, what kind of choices would you make to fuel yourself?
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Valerie226 View Post
    those of you who are low carbers, what kind of choices would you make to fuel yourself?
    One thing I'm loving about the low-carb/Primal eating we've been doing is that I am not usually very hungry. If I need a snack, I like celery with almond butter, carrot and pepper strips, a cheese stick (if you eat dairy), a handful of almonds or walnuts, an apple (if that's not too high in carbs), a hard boiled egg, or a strip of bacon. I've also been known to drink a few tablespoons of cream, but I'm kinda embarrassed to admit that! Anything with a little bit of fat makes me happy and full.

  26. #26
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,648
    Seriously? that is a fair amount of work. It's cold out. an egg? carrot sticks?

    I'm trying hard to understand how this approach could work for anyone who is fairly active, especially outdoor sports. the above calorie burn is significant. I'm estimating at least 300 calories an hour x 5 hours. If you don't get back to your car, there is no one around ...you die.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  27. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Heading WEST!!
    Posts
    15,184
    You don't always need to eat the calories you need---this is how people burn off excess fat
    I would pack some Jerky (I dont buy it because there is usually too much corn syrup for my liking), hard boiled eggs, cheese and nuts.
    Anything I would want to carry would have to be nutrient dense, so even though veggies are good for you, they are not nutrient dense. Even carrying a low-carb tortilla with nut butter or plain butter and cheese would be fine. If you want a vegetable, bring a v-8 or tomato juice--SMALL container.

    "its cold out...an egg?"...as opposed to a colder still luna bar or brownie ?

    Thermos of hot chicken broth or beef broth--you can even leave some of the meat
    You can bring chicken salad with italian dressing since you don't like mayo.
    Protein shakes if you prefer liquid.

    ...and don't forget flares and a cell phone, so you don't die!!
    Last edited by wallycat; 01-12-2012 at 12:01 PM.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  28. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    3,155
    Whenever we go backcountry we pack a substantial number of energy bars as 'emergency' rations. Lunch or snacks often include cheese, smoked salmon or sausage, crackers or bagels, dried fruit, nuts or gorp, fresh fruit, and lots of water. Sometimes we bring energy shots - maybe Cliff shots? They don't seem to do a whole lot for me but dh says they really make a difference for him. If we are going to be working hard we try and bring a good source of potassium.
    Anne

  29. #29
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,648
    Didn't want to be overly melodramatic with the 'we die" part, but honestly, we go to undeveloped places and usually don't see anyone else.
    Our intent is not to replace all the calories burned, but not generate too much of a deficit. Endurance activity is not a good time to be too restrictive... makes you feel burned out, and things can go wrong.

    There's plenty of snow/ running water. we always carry a stove. a thermos weighs too much for too little benefit. better to carry a stove, heat water as needed.
    so cheese, PB, nuts. neither of us eat hard boiled eggs. In warm weather we carry fresh veggies, fruit. not so much in winter. pack is heavier to begin with, and it's a lot about the weight vs the calories. I carry Nuun tablets ( electrolyte source) for water flavoring. Clif shots? don't know what those are.

    I'm going to see if DH wants to try this as an experiment on our next trip.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  30. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    In
    Posts
    5,780
    Wallycat, I just read the study that you posted. Thank you. I certainly don't have a low BMI, I'm not overweight, but ya know, things kind of get out of hand when you get older. I remember my doc talking to me about my elevated sugar levels and my family history. So, maybe it isn't the statins.You've been so helpful with all of the information you have been providing. Thank you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •