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Thread: Grinding Almond Flour?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Grinding Almond Flour?

    Can I use my food processor to grind whole almonds to make almond flour? And is there some "trick" to judging when to stop the processor so I don't end up with a lot of almond butter???

    Also, can I use the brown-skin almonds instead of blanched?

    Thanks!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I have only tried to grind walnuts and pecans because i have almond allergies. Pecans I pulse till I get the consistency I want and I make sure I stir at least once. The walnuts are really hard to grind to a fine consistency because they are so oily they make a paste and mush. I have to pulse and take out what is to my liking, then continue.
    I don't know how oily the almonds will be.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    I grind blanched (no skin) almonds for a whole orange cake that I make - it isn't critical that the 'flour' be finely ground. In fact, a little bit of tiny pieces makes it great. Almond flour you buy in the store (Whole Foods, e.g.) is very finely ground. If you decide to grind your own, pulse it and 'stir' it in the processor. I think you'll know when you are getting too close to butter - it will get a bit wet looking. Don't let it get to that point!

    Do you need notes on how to blanch your almonds and get rid of the brown skin? Here are some instructions I recently found:

    To blanch almonds - put in pot of simmering water for about 1 min. Drain and put in a bowl of cold water. Pinch each nut; skin will slide off. Let cool completely and dry before grinding.

    Hope this helps!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    I grind almonds for a couple things I make for Xmas every year - almond paste and Zimt Stars (aka Zimtsterne or Cinnamon Stars, my wife's favourite cookie and it's gluten free). For the almond paste I use blanched almonds (and sometimes blanch regular almonds, pouring boiling water over top and letting rest 30 to 60 seconds, draining and squeezing off the skins when cool enough to handle, then letting them air dry for a while. For the stars I have used and prefer skin-on almonds, not blanched. For the almond paste I grind just to the point of getting some oil, but for the cookies I stop before oil is released. I don't find it hard to find that point - I accept that small pieces of almonds are going to be OK in what I am making and don't try to pulverize to dust-like consistency. As Marsha says it isn't critical that the "flour" be finely ground for cakes (or cookies) - they will be fine ground to little bits of nut. Even making almond paste with more finely ground almonds I have a few nut bits easily seen but not a concern for me.
    Cheers! Andy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
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    Marsha, I've been blanching almonds using that method for years and it really works well, just is rather tedious...

    Okay, pulsing and stirring often... I hope that it works since the whole almonds are a lot less expensive than almond flour!

    hAndyman, funny you should mention zimtsterne... I made them for the first time a few weeks ago and tossed the cookies out. There was a recipe in in Saveur and they looked so good, but were time-intensive. I actually figured out beforehand that the recipe needed more egg whites, so the dough was a good texture, and I loved the egg white-confectioners' sugar glaze, but they were horribly sweet. Way too sweet.
    Unfortunately, the recipe called for blanched almonds (almost a pound of them) and I wasted them!

    I'm going to try making almond flour in the next day or so, and I'll let you all know how it turns out-- thanks so much for the advice!!!
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

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