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Thread: Seriously impressive Salt Crusted Potatoes w Cilantro Garlic Mojo

  1. #1
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    Thumbs up Seriously impressive Salt Crusted Potatoes w Cilantro Garlic Mojo

    This was SO easy and I swear I may never cook potatoes another way again!

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    http://www.thespicedlife.com/2013/09...ith-chris.html
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

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  2. #2
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    This looks awesome! What kind of chili pepper did you use?

  3. #3
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    I've had something similar to this and agree very tasty! I'm going to make these right quick!
    Everyone needs to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer. . .

  4. #4
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    I always wanted to try those. A former poster on the GW cooking forum lives in the Canary Islands and would often showcase them on trips to local restaurants. I think they were served with green and red mojo sauces. Do you by any chance have a recipe for a red mojo?

  5. #5
    This sounds like a variation of the Salt Potatoes which originated in Syracuse, New York.

    "Salt potatoes are a regional dish of Syracuse, New York, typically served in the summer when the young potatoes are first harvested. They are a staple food at fairs and barbecues. In the Central New York region where they are the most popular, potatoes specifically intended for salt potatoes can be purchased by the bag along with packages of salt. As the potatoes cook, the salty water forms a crust on the skin and seals the potatoes so they never taste water-logged like ordinary boiled potatoes often do. The potatoes have a unique texture closer to fluffy baked potatoes, only creamier. The standard recipe calls for one pound of salt for every four pounds of potatoes.

    The Syracuse, New York, area has a long history of salt production. Salt springs located around Onondaga Lake were used to create consumable salt that was distributed throughout the northeast via the Erie Canal. Salinated brine was laid out to dry on large trays. The salt residue was then scraped up, ground, and packaged. Salt potatoes originated in Syracuse and once comprised the bulk of a salt worker's daily diet. During the 1800s, Irish salt miners would bring a bag of small, unpeeled, substandard potatoes to work each day. Come lunch time, they boiled the potatoes in the "free-flowing" salt brine."


    Source: Wikipedia.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SallyT View Post
    This looks awesome! What kind of chili pepper did you use?
    I believe we used a jalapeno and scraped it out pretty well because of the kids.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by charley View Post
    I always wanted to try those. A former poster on the GW cooking forum lives in the Canary Islands and would often showcase them on trips to local restaurants. I think they were served with green and red mojo sauces. Do you by any chance have a recipe for a red mojo?
    Ha I was going to say no but then I thought "consult eat your books!" and it appears I have 22 recipes with the word mojo in it lol. Most look green or herbal in some way, but there is one in The Food of Spain by Claudia Rodenand then also in Tapas: Sensational Small Plates from Spain by Joyce Goldstein and Leigh Beisch. The link is to a Fine Cooking article--let me know if it works for you and if it looks right.

    Woo-hoo! Eat Your Books is worth it again!
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeaHamm View Post
    This sounds like a variation of the Salt Potatoes which originated in Syracuse, New York.

    "Salt potatoes are a regional dish of Syracuse, New York, typically served in the summer when the young potatoes are first harvested. They are a staple food at fairs and barbecues. In the Central New York region where they are the most popular, potatoes specifically intended for salt potatoes can be purchased by the bag along with packages of salt. As the potatoes cook, the salty water forms a crust on the skin and seals the potatoes so they never taste water-logged like ordinary boiled potatoes often do. The potatoes have a unique texture closer to fluffy baked potatoes, only creamier. The standard recipe calls for one pound of salt for every four pounds of potatoes.

    The Syracuse, New York, area has a long history of salt production. Salt springs located around Onondaga Lake were used to create consumable salt that was distributed throughout the northeast via the Erie Canal. Salinated brine was laid out to dry on large trays. The salt residue was then scraped up, ground, and packaged. Salt potatoes originated in Syracuse and once comprised the bulk of a salt worker's daily diet. During the 1800s, Irish salt miners would bring a bag of small, unpeeled, substandard potatoes to work each day. Come lunch time, they boiled the potatoes in the "free-flowing" salt brine."

    Isn't that interesting. I wonder if Mediterranean immigrants brought the technique? It just seems unlikely that it originated completely anywhere away from the ocean, but that is still cool to know. I was really blown away by these potatoes.
    Source: Wikipedia.
    -Laura

    Muffins are for people who don't have the 'nads to order cake for breakfast.
    --Seth, "Kitchen Confidential" (the show, not the book)

    www.thespicedlife.com/

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by LeaHamm View Post
    This sounds like a variation of the Salt Potatoes which originated in Syracuse, New York.

    "Salt potatoes are a regional dish of Syracuse, New York, typically served in the summer when the young potatoes are first harvested. They are a staple food at fairs and barbecues. In the Central New York region where they are the most popular, potatoes specifically intended for salt potatoes can be purchased by the bag along with packages of salt. As the potatoes cook, the salty water forms a crust on the skin and seals the potatoes so they never taste water-logged like ordinary boiled potatoes often do. The potatoes have a unique texture closer to fluffy baked potatoes, only creamier. The standard recipe calls for one pound of salt for every four pounds of potatoes.

    The Syracuse, New York, area has a long history of salt production. Salt springs located around Onondaga Lake were used to create consumable salt that was distributed throughout the northeast via the Erie Canal. Salinated brine was laid out to dry on large trays. The salt residue was then scraped up, ground, and packaged. Salt potatoes originated in Syracuse and once comprised the bulk of a salt worker's daily diet. During the 1800s, Irish salt miners would bring a bag of small, unpeeled, substandard potatoes to work each day. Come lunch time, they boiled the potatoes in the "free-flowing" salt brine."


    Source: Wikipedia.


    I live 25 miles from Salt City (Syracuse). Never had salt potatoes before we moved here. Love them. It is a MUST at picnics, clambakes, etc. We buy that at local supermarkets from Hinderwalder's, our big clambake caterer

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljt2r View Post
    Ha I was going to say no but then I thought "consult eat your books!" and it appears I have 22 recipes with the word mojo in it lol. Most look green or herbal in some way, but there is one in The Food of Spain by Claudia Rodenand then also in Tapas: Sensational Small Plates from Spain by Joyce Goldstein and Leigh Beisch. The link is to a Fine Cooking article--let me know if it works for you and if it looks right.

    Woo-hoo! Eat Your Books is worth it again!
    Thank you so much!

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