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Thread: Currant Jelly?

  1. #1
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    Currant Jelly?

    I feel rather stupied asking this--I feel I should know...but I don't. What is it??
    I have a pork chop recipe that calls for it, I can't find it labeled "currant jelly" in the grocery store. My first impression is apple jelly.
    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thanks, Carolyn

  2. #2
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    currants are berries that are slightly smaller than raisins and I believe are a little more tart. Like currant scones.....those little dried things....and they make jelly out of them....
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  3. #3
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    Currant jelly is, as it's name says, jelly made from currants, a type of small berry. I have a recipe that calls for it, and last time I looked for it, it was hard to find -- I guess it's not that popular. If you can't find it, I'm not sure what kind of jelly to substitute -- maybe another poster will have a suggestion. Good luck!

  4. #4
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    Not a stupid question at all. It's just what it says: a jelly made from currants. Yes, it's difficult to find, but when I have, it's just been with all the other jams/jellies, etc., in the store.

    Cook's Thesaurus (www.foodsubs.com)offers this for substitutes:

    currant jelly Notes: There are two types: black currant jelly and the far more common red currant jelly. Substitutes: grape jelly OR 3 parts apple jelly plus 1 part lemon juice OR muscadine jelly

  5. #5
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    I tried to post this 1/2 hour ago, but couldn't.

    This duplicates Ralph's information (but my link has pictures if you want to see various dark blobs of jelly), but was just trying to see if the reply function is working for me yet.

    Cook's Thesaurus recommends substituting grape jelly or 3 parts apple jelly plus 1 part lemon juice. Here is the link where I found the information:

    http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruitpre.html#currant%20jelly

    Currants used in cooking are like small raisins (and presumably start their life as a fruit similar to a grape). You ought to be able to find it with other jellies at the grocery store. I think Smuckers makes red currant jelly (8-12 oz probably)--I don't know that I've ever seen black currant jelly. It might also be found with the jellies, but separately with the specialty jellies (imported marmelade, for example). Given the totally random variety of places grocery stores use to place their products, it might also be found in some specialty food area.

    Although it has been many years since I have used currant jelly, it seems to me that it is not as sweet as grape jelly (which I think is VERY sweet).
    Susan

    So many books--So little time.

  6. #6
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    Thank you all very much...I noticed all of you were having problems posting your response. Thanks for taking the extra step and emailing me.
    I have some grape jelly at home I will give that a try. I went to 3 grocery stores looking for currant jelly in the jelly/jam aisle (thanks Ralph) and none there.
    Carolyn--

  7. #7
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    I have some in my fridge that I just used to make pickled red cabbage. I wish I could e-mail it over... .

  8. #8
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    I wish you could too Nancy!!!

    Carolyn

  9. #9

    Smuckers Makes It

    Carolyn,

    Are you absolutely sure the three stores didn't have it? Even Smuckers makes it. It's called "Red Currant Jelly" . I'd never heard of it either before I first used it, but now I can find it anywhere.

  10. #10
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    Red Currant Jelly is often found next to lemon curd and imported jellies in grcoeries. I prefer a brand called Crosse & Blackwell (which is actually owned by Nestle). If your grocery store doesn't sell this jelly near regular jellies, it may be in the foreign foods/ethnic foods section - try the German foods or English foods section, if your store has one. It is usually more available during the holidays, so now is the time to find it. When I couldn't find red currant jelly, I use raspberry, blackberry, boysenberry, or lingonberry jelly. Red currant jelly is more tart than many jellies and can also be used as a glaze for chicken.

    Update: I found an online source for you as well:
    smuckers has online ordering:

    www.onlinestore.smuckers.com

  11. #11
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    Red currant jelly is hugely popular in Europe, like grape is here. I can find it in my store, usually way up high, off to one side, but I imagine since Smuckers makes it, as long as your store carries Smuckers, they can surely order it for you.

    I have a red currant berry bush in my backyard. The berries are wonderful, and make fabulous tarts in the summer. I grew up eating these in my Grandma's backyard (along with gooseberries), and decided I had to have my own bush when I finally got my own house! I have never tried to make jelly out of them though....

  12. #12
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    Grace is exactly right. Redcurrant Jelly is made from redcurrants which grow on a small bush - over here, we also have blackcurrants and white currants, but redcurrants are most common. We have pick-your-own farms, where we can go and get them reasonably cheaply in season and either freeze them, or make jelly from them. Have been talking to Gail about Summer Pudding, a wonderful English pudding which is made by lining a bowl with slices of bread and pouring therein a melange of redcurrants and raspberries - was amazed that she didn't know redcurrants! Would have thought they would grow very easily in the temperate parts of your country.
    Anyway - agree that if you can't get redcurrant jelly, apple or grape would prob. be a good substitute - might not be quite as tart, so adding a little lemon juice as well might be good idea.

  13. #13
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    Thank you all so much for the info. I never would have guessed currant jelly (preferably red) is little berries grown on bushes. Very enlightening! Out of the three stores I looked at I believe the first one had red berry currant jelly. "I think"
    I will stop by there on my way home and see. I didn't get it earlier because I had it pictured in my mind apple color--not knowing what it actually is made from. I also believe it was on the tippy top shelf.
    I'll let you know if I found it and how my pork chops turned out.
    Carolyn

  14. #14
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    Red Currant Jelly--no other flavor like it!!

    Hi All,
    Well I stopped at the first store on the way home and wa la there on the tippy top shelf was ONE jar of Crosse & Blackwell Red Currant Jelly!!! After my first wave of excitement it dawned on me how many years has this jar been sitting here. It was the only jar and no expiration date. Used it anyway, it was wonderful! My DH saw me preparing the glaze with sauteed onions and this jelly and dijon mustard--he was turning up his nose. BUT, he loved the dish.
    So...without your comments I would have used apple jelly and it would not have been as tasty.-- So Thanks everyone.
    Carolyn

  15. #15
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    Glad you found the jelly and the recipe turned out well. I was looking at your ingredients -- currant jelly and mustard . . . I used to make cocktail weiners in a sauce made from a jar of mustard and a jar of currant jelly. I think it was a Betty Crocker recipe (if anyone's interested, please check first -- this was a long time ago!). Anyway, I remember them as being really good.

  16. #16
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    And here's a recipe for you to use up some more of the extra red currant jelly:

    Swedish Pancakes

    1 cup Bisquick Light
    3/4 cup skim milk
    2 eggs
    red currant jelly, as desired

    Whisk together Bisquick, milk and eggs until blended. Spray a nonstick small omelette pan with butter flavor Pam spray and heat on medium-low.

    Pour about 1/4 cup batter into pan - immediately rotate skillet until batter covers bottom. Cook until golden brown. Run wide spatula around edge to loosen; turn and cook other side until golden brown.

    To serve, roll up the pancakes like a jelly roll and serve with red currant jelly.

    These are wonderful!

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