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Thread: substitute for molasses?

  1. #1
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    substitute for molasses?

    Does anyone know of a decent subsititute for molasses? I have a chicken recipe that calls for it and I don't want to buy a whole jar just to use a few tablespoons. Or are there suggestions on other uses of molasses so I can do something with the rest of the jar? Thanks!

  2. #2
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    From Cook's Thesaurus:

    "molasses = treacle Pronunciation: muh-LASS-sis Equivalents: One cup = 8 ounces Notes: Sugar is made by extracting juice from sugar cane or sugar beets, boiling them, and then extracting the sugar crystals. Molasses is the thick, syrupy residue that's left behind in the vats. It has a sweet, distinctive flavor, and it's a traditional ingredient in such things as gingerbread, baked beans, rye bread, and shoofly pie. There are several different varieties. Light molasses = sweet molasses = mild molasses = Barbados molasses is taken from the first boiling. It's the sweetest and mildest, and is often used as a pancake syrup or a sweetener for beverages. Dark molasses = full molasses = full-flavored molasses is left behind after the juices are boiled a second time. It's less sweet but more flavorful than light molasses, and it's a good choice if a recipe simply calls for molasses. Blackstrap molasses comes from the third and final boiling. It's too strong and bitter for most recipes, and it's mostly consumed for its alleged nutritional benefits. Most of the molasses sold in supermarkets is unsulfured. Sulfured molasses has sulfur dioxide added as a preservative, and isn't as mild and sweet as unsulfured molasses. Food grade molasses is almost always made from sugar cane. Sugar beet molasses is very bitter and is mostly used as cattle feed or as a medium for growing yeast. When measuring molasses, grease the cup and utensils to keep molasses from sticking. If your molasses crystallizes while being stored, heat it gently to dissolve the crystals. After opening, you can store molasses in your cupboard. Substitutes: dark corn syrup OR maple syrup (works well in gingerbread cookies) OR honey OR barley malt syrup (weaker flavor; use 1/3 less) OR brown sugar (Substitute 1.5 cups brown sugar for every 1 cup molasses)"

  3. #3
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    You could make molasses spiced cookies in cooks Illustrated's recent issue. It keeps well in the cupboard (at least that's where i've been keeping it) so if the recipe turns out...you'll have it for next time.
    Also, some BBQ sauces call for it....
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  4. #4
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    Oh, please don't substitute for molasses! It's the most wonderful stuff, and it keeps forever, so you wouldn't have to use it up right away.
    If you buy some, go for the dark, full-flavored molasses -- lucious, and it gives the most flavor.

    If you really want to use it up, though, here's the most wonderful cookie recipe in the world -- we call 'em molasses cookies, though.
    I've lightened them, and my extended family, whose eating habits are decidedly not "light," beg for me to make them every Christmas. They are truly not missing a thing with less fat. I think it's the molasses.

    Ginger-sugar cookies

    Sift together in a bowl:
    2 cups all-purpose flour
    2 t. baking soda
    1 t. cinnamon
    1 t. cloves
    1 t. ginger
    1/4 t. salt

    In another bowl beat together until fluffy:
    5 T. light butter (I use Land O' Lakes light butter, but if you must, I suppose you could use the full-fat version. )
    1 cup sugar
    Then beat in:
    1/4 cup molasses
    1 egg

    Beat flour and molasses mixtures together; refrigerate dough for 1 hour.

    Form rounded tablespoons of dough into balls; roll in 1/4 c. sugar. Bake at 375 for 8-10 minutes; cool on wire racks.

    *I like to bake them for the least amount of time as possible -- they're chewier that way. They'll be soft when you take them from the pans (parchment paper works like a dream here), but they'll harden, so don't be tempted to bake them for longer than sugggested.

    I made some of these this weekend -- they are so good!
    "What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?"
    By W. C. Fields

  5. #5
    Emily, these sound amazing! Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Oh, Yum. My Mom makes cookies like these and they are my favorties. These ones sound lighter though, so I'm trying them. Thanks for the recipe, Emily.

  7. #7
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    Emily, does molasses keep forever? I always thought so, but the molasses people say it should be discarded six months after opening. Since I don't bake much (I can't stop myself from inhaling home baked goodies), I only use a little molasses at Christmas, then have the rest of the bottle molding in my cupboard. No info on how long it keeps unopened.

  8. #8
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    Emily, does molasses keep forever? I always thought so, but the molasses
    people say it should be discarded six months after opening.


    Heh, heh. I can tell you right now that my molasses has been in the cabinet way longer than six months. I'm sure it wouldn't last me any longer than a year, though, so I'm not certain how long it could last.

    BTW, I usually get about 32 of these cookies -- they have 60 calories and 1 gram of fat each.
    You must let me know if you try them, guys! Then I'll tell you how much shortening the original recipe called for.
    "What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?"
    By W. C. Fields

  9. #9
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    I've kept mine for over a year....hate to admit one bottle I had around for 3 or 4 years--opened... God knows if there were microscopic things in it, but no surface mold, no off taste, no off smell.....
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  10. #10
    Emily, these cookies ROCK!!! Thanks so much!

  11. #11
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    Wow, you already made them!?! I'm impressed.
    Well, you're very welcome -- I'm so pleased you liked them!
    The chewy chocolate ones from Jan/Feb. are on my list for this weekend -- the molasses ones will be gone by then. (all BF's fault )
    "What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?"
    By W. C. Fields

  12. #12
    Originally posted by emilycat
    Wow, you already made them!?! I'm impressed.
    Well I was worried about the molasses that's been in my pantry for about a year........

  13. #13
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    Living in Kentucky in a small town, I know molasses makers who live out in the country in our small county. They make them fresh each fall and sell them in fruit jars by the quart. I always buy two or three quarts for me, two or three for daughters and they are used in recipes and the best way down here in the country. I showed my "big-city" sons-in-law how to eat them country style over Christmas and I could not keep enough biscuits made.

    Get a small plate, put some butter or Take Control Light (or whatever you prefer) maybe about a tablespoon full and pour some molasses over it and mix it according to your taste. Some people like more butter, some like more molasses. Spoon over homemade biscuits hot from the oven. One of my favorite desserts! Also works with fresh honey which is also produced locally and sold by farmers in quart fruit jars. Sometimes it pays to live close to the source.

    As to going bad, the only thing I have ever observed with an old jar is sometimes they "go to sugar" (get sugar crystals in them). If this happens, just either reboil them in a pan on the stove or run them in the microwave to melt the sugar and you are good to go again. This probably won't happen as much with commercially produced molasses as with the homemade variety. If we don't consume them after a year, what is left sometimes will go to sugar, but usually they don't last that long.

    I hope this was not more than you wanted to know.

  14. #14
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    Smile

    Thanks guys for all the info! I can't wait to try the cookies and the biscuit dessert! They sound Mmmm!

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