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Thread: Q: Italian Easter Bread - not sweet?

  1. #1
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    Question Q: Italian Easter Bread - not sweet?

    Hello and Happy Easter !
    Does anyone know of an Italian Easter Bread called something like "shedone"??? It has ham, cheese, raisins, etc. in it. I've searched and not found this out. Pls. help if you can!!!
    Thanks!
    Jeanne
    Last edited by Jeanne G; 03-26-2002 at 05:04 AM.

  2. #2
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    Here's a recipe I found, although I have never seen this bread. Hope it's similar to what you are looking for.


    http://www.recipegoldmine.com/easter/easter50.html

    SHADONE (Italian Easter Bread)

    4 C. all-purpose flour
    1 1/2 T. salt
    1 T. baking powder
    3 eggs
    1/2 C. Crisco
    2 tsp. sugar
    Water
    15 eggs
    3 C. ham, chopped
    3/4 lb. Cheddar cheese
    3/4 lb. Swiss cheese
    3/4 lb. Muenster cheese

    Prepare flour, salt, baking powder, the 3 eggs, Crisco, sugar and water as pie crust. Line pie pans. Combine the 15 eggs, ham and cheeses. Beat eggs well. Add chopped ham and chopped cheeses. Season with garlic salt and pepper. Pour mixture into lined pie pans. Bake at 350 for 45 minutes or until knife comes out clean. Bake about 3 (9-inch) breads.

  3. #3
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    You are awesome!

    Funnybone, Thank you!

    I've searched high and low and didn't find anything, even in a couple Italian recipe books I have and on Italian food websites like Ciao Italia with tons of yummy looking recipes.

    Wow, does this look fattening or what!!!??? It looks more like a pie! Maybe I'll try lightening it! Thanks again!!!!!

  4. #4
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    You are welcome!

    It sure has a lot of eggs in it. I'd think it is almost like a quiche. If you make it, let us know how it is.

  5. #5
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    "Bread" seems like a funny thing to call this. Do you know if it's supposed to be bread-y or if it's a quiche-y thing?

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Gracie
    "Bread" seems like a funny thing to call this. Do you know if it's supposed to be bread-y or if it's a quiche-y thing?

    Loren
    I have no clue as this is the first time I heard of the recipe. I just happened to find it, but my thought was that it seemed like a quiche. Different countries call foods by different names - this could be one of them that they didn't translate well.

  7. #7
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    Funnybone & Loren,

    I got ahold of a friend today who has made this and told her about the recipe. She's acutally made it with her great aunt (from Italy), but didn't really have a recipe, since her aunt "just makes it". I explained to her the recipe you posted and she described something much more like bread. She said they make a lot of dough. And that the one they make is a bread, with the dough and then layered with the eggs, cheese, ham, and raisins, then topped with the dough again, in a woven fashion. Then topped with an egg wash with sugar. Her guess is that there may be many variations of this recipe. I'll continue to search it out, b/c the one you found definitely sounds like a quiche! Interesting food for thought!

  8. #8
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    I'm pretty sure I have a recipe at home. I think it's in the Saveur Cooks Authentic Italian cookbook. I can look when I get home and post the recipe, if you'd like. (I couldn't find it on their Web site.)

  9. #9
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    Wonderwoman,
    I would welcome the recipe! Thank you for posting! It seems that there may be many different versions of this "bread". And I would love to find one that is more bread than "quiche".
    Thanks again!
    Jeanne

  10. #10
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    recipe

    Jeanne,
    This might not be it. It has olives, not raisins, but it is definitely bread. I have about three or four recipes for a sweet Italian Easter bread with raisins or candied fruit, but this is the only Easter bread I found with ham.

    Torta Salata Pasquale (Easter Bread with Prosciutto and Olives)

    3 3/4 c. flour
    1 1/2 T. baking powder
    3/4 c. extra virgin olive oil
    1 1/4 c. dry white wine
    6 eggs
    1/4 lb. prosciutto slices, sliced into short strips
    1/4 lb. mortadella slices, sliced into short strips
    1 c. whole black olives, pitted and sliced (preferably Italian, such as gaeta)
    1/2 c. grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
    Freshly ground black pepper

    Preheat oven to 350. Grease and flour an 8.5" by 11" cakepan. Sift flour and baking powder together into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the center and add olive oil, white wine, and 1/2 cup water. Stir with a fork until well blended.

    Beat eggs in another mixing bowl, then stir into flour mixture. Add prosciutto and mortadella to batter along with olives and parmigiano. Season with pepper, pour into pan, and bake until golden, about 1 hour. Cool slightly, then turn out onto a wire rack to let cool completely. -- From Saveur Cooks Authentic Italian

  11. #11
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    You guys on the board are so helpful!

    Wonderwoman,
    Thank you ~ this looks much more like bread! And really different. I have a question, though, as I've never used mortadella. I did a quick search for it on epicurious's food dictionary and it came up with this:

    [mohr-tuh-DEHL-uh]
    This smoked sausage originated in Bologna, Italy, and is the original from which the slang name "baloney" came. It's made with ground beef and pork, cubes of pork fat and seasonings. The Italian version, which is not imported because it requires additional cooking steps before the U.S. government will approve it, is air-dried and has a smooth, delicate flavor. Canned, cooked versions are imported from Italy but they do not taste like the original. The American mortadella is basically bologna with cubes of pork fat and added garlic flavor. The Germans produce an excellent mortadella that contains pistachio nuts.

    So, it sounds like the American version is almost bologna, yuck!!! Maybe I should just use 1/2 lb of prosciutto -or- sub some kielbasa? What do you think?

    Thanks again everyone! After hearing my friend talk of Easter Bread, and since I'm hosting a dinner this Sunday, I really wanted to do something with Easter Tradition!

  12. #12
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    Jeanne,
    I've never made the bread, but I agree with you. The mortadella sounds gross. :P I don't see why you couldn't use 1/2 lb. prosciutto, or maybe sub 1/4 lb. of another kind of ham? I was in Oakville Grocery this weekend (a specialty grocery chain out here) and they had several different kinds of ham, some of which looked Italian-inspired. Maybe a deli or Italian grocery in your area would have something?

    I'm not sure about Kielbasa. Maybe the spices would be too different?

    Just my 2 cents

  13. #13
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    BTW -- I love mortadella, but then again, I love b-o-l-o-g-n-a.
    --Mary Kate--

    "In all our woods there is not a tree so hard to kill as the buckeye. The deepest girdling does not deaden it, and even after it is cut down and worked up into the side of a cabin it will send out young branches, denoting to all the world that Buckeyes are not easily conquered, and could with difficulty be destroyed." - Daniel Drake, 1833

  14. #14
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    Re: You guys on the board are so helpful!

    Originally posted by Jeanne G
    This smoked sausage originated in Bologna, Italy, and is the original from which the slang name "baloney" came. It's made with ground beef and pork, cubes of pork fat and seasonings. The Italian version, which is not imported because it requires additional cooking steps before the U.S. government will approve it, is air-dried and has a smooth, delicate flavor. Canned, cooked versions are imported from Italy but they do not taste like the original. The American mortadella is basically bologna with cubes of pork fat and added garlic flavor. [/B]
    Mortadella looks like bologna with big chunks of white fat in it. Since the recipe already calls for prosciutto you could try substituting Genoa salami which would be less fat, a little different on the spices, but still genuine Italian, unlike kielbasa. Plus, salami is a lot easier to "feel good about eating", not quite so gross as mortadella.

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  15. #15
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    Wonderwoman,

    I just wanted to let you know that I made your Italian Easter bread! And, I'll tell you that I actually bought the mortadella b/c a friend who owns/runs a deli & pasta shop here said she loves this stuff when I was in there last week. Only when I made the bread I looked at the stuff and decided to make it without!!!! It really does have those fat "cubes" in there!! Anyhow, the recipe was very different and good. It had a very strong olive oil flavor. Imagine that!

    Thanks to everyone who shared on this thread, it was fun for me to do something based on real tradition, since nothing else I made for dinner was traditional!

    Thanks again!

  16. #16
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    Jeanne,
    I'm glad the recipe turned out well. Fat cubes just aren't that appetizing. So did you use just 1/4 lb. of prosciutto? I might have to try this for our next dinner party.
    Jessica

  17. #17
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    Jessica (that's my SIL's name, I love it!)
    I used only 1/4 lb. of the prosciutto, and that's plenty I think. Maybe a little more? And, the recipe calls for "whole" olives, and the ones I got were with the pit, so they were not whole, just slivers off the pit! And, I put more cheese in there too. My suggestion might be to put more meat and another ingredient, what is Italian? I'm not sure. Maybe garlic? Or maybe some combo of olives? Or sundried tomato cut fine? It is definitely like a pizza type crust, not rising much, etc. But good. Most importantly, thanks for this: I loved having tradition at my table.

    Thank you and everyone else!!!

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