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Thread: Brown Rice in a rice cooker?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
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    Gaithersburg, MD
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    Brown Rice in a rice cooker?

    I have a rice cooker (the cannister non see through kind) and I would like to try adding brown rice to our meals. Does anyone know the proportions of water to rice I would have to use? I think you are supposed to use less water than stovetop directions on the package, due to less moisture loss in the cooker, but I'm not sure by how much. The directions for the rice cooker dont say anything about brown rice.
    Also I want to try making the yummy sticky rice you get in Thai restaurants. Do they use jasmine rice or do they cook it a special way?
    Thank you fellow foodies!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
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    24,226
    Thai sticky rice is actually different for regular rice (it a glutinous rice). Here's an interesting tidbit I found for you:

    Sticky or Glutinous Rice (Kao Neuw)

    While the people from central and southern Thailand eat regular long-grain rice, the northern and northeastern Thais eat another type of long-grain rice, known as kao neuw, or sticky rice. Kao neuw grains adhere to each other and are easily shaped into balls. The Laotians also share this custom.

    Sticky rice is chewy and tastes buttery and nutty. Cooked sticky rice is traditionally kept in, and served from, a beautiful bamboo woven basket, where it stays moist and warm for a long time. Because sticky rice is eaten only with the hands, a strict etiquette of washing before a meal is practiced.

    To eat, each person takes a handful of sticky rice from the container and breaks off a small amount, kneading it into a ball. This small ball of rice is then dipped into sauce or used to scoop up pieces of vegetable or meat.

    Thai people believe that sticky rice makes them mellow. Therefore, it is common to rest after eating sticky rice. One should avoid eating sticky rice and consuming cold liquids at the same time - it is believed that cold liquids will solidify the already sticky rice, making digestion difficult. The people of central Thailand, who seldom eat sticky rice, believe that those who eat sticky rice tend to be lazy!



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Cooking Sticky Rice in a Pasta Pot

    Makes 4 to 5 servings

    2 cups long-grain Thai jasmine sticky rice
    Soak the rice in cool water overnight before cooking. Line the steamer basket insert of a pasta pot with fresh corn husks or soaked dried corn husks (used as Mexican tamale wrappers). Spray the corn husks with vegetable oil spray to prevent sticking. Drain the soaked rice and spread it evenly over the husks.

    Fill the pot with water to come to just under the steamer basket insert. Put the steamer basket insert into the pot, cover, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Steam the rice for at least 20 minutes, or longer. Transfer the rice to a serving bowl when ready to serve. Cover the rice with some corn husks to keep it moist and warm.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
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    Here is a recipe from FoodNetwork, it doesn't say what kind of rice to use though:

    Sticky Rice



    c.1997, M.S. Milliken & S. Feniger, all rights reserved

    2 cups sticky rice
    Soak the rice in cold water to cover by 2 inches for 3 hours up to overnight.

    Drain the rice and transfer to a bamboo steaming basket, or a colander or steaming basket which can be suspended over boiling water. Set aside.

    Fill a wok or saucepan with water. Place a rack or tray at least 1 inch above the water, cover the wok, and bring the water to a boil over high heat. Uncover the wok and place the rice filled steaming basket on the rack over the steam. Cover and reduce the heat to maintain a steady steam, and cook until the rice is sticky enough to be squeezed into small lumps, about 30 to 45 minutes.

    Add boiling water to the pan as needed to maintain the original level.

    When the rice is done, turn it out onto a large baking sheet. Wet a wooden spoon and quickly and gently spread the rice out into a shallow layer to help release some of the steam. When the rice is cool enough to touch, gather it into a large lump and place it into a basket or on a serving plate. Serve hot, warm or room temperature.

    Yield: 5 cups; about 4 servings
    Prep Time: 3 hours
    Cook Time: 45 minutes
    Difficulty: Easy



    Just found my leaflet for my rice cooker, here's what it says:

    The measuring scoop provided is based on 5 1/2-ounce (150g) rather than a standard mesuring cup of 8-ounces (227g).

    For brown rice:
    1 cup rice(assuming cup that came with machine)
    water to level 2 in pot, plus 3/4 cup

    I have had 2 rice cookers (this one is larger) and both cooked brown rice the same way even though they were different brands of cookers.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
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    2,228
    I have a rice cooker,(HAD IT FOR 30 YEARS HAD TO BUY IT IN AN ASIAN STORE IN WEST LOS ANGELES)and I use the same proportions in cooking brown or white long grain rice. For each cup of rice I add 2 cups of water. If I want to make less, I still use 1 measure of rice to 2 measures of water. I don't add salt. You can add a dab of butter or margarine. DO NOT WASH RICE UNLESS THE LABEL TELLS YOU SO!
    Basmati white rice I DO NOT cook in the rice cooker. Just a plain small sauce pot with a lid. I WASH the basmati 3 times in water, then proceed as with other rice, 1 rice 2 water a dab of butter. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and it will be done in about 10 minutes. Watch it closely.
    Curleytop

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Near Fresno, CA
    Posts
    6,219
    Is sticky rice like sushi rice? If it is, I used CA short grain. I also made it in my rice cooker.
    *Susan*

    "One of the advantages of being disorderly is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries."

    A.A. Milne

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    24,226
    Interesting that you rinse basmati. Is it imported basmati? I buy Texmati brand rice and have never rinsed any of it and cook all rice in my cooker. Even when I lived in Singapore and had a rice cooker there, no rinsing.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

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