Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: OT: Convection cooking turkey

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    82

    Unhappy OT: Convection cooking turkey

    Well I tried this for the first time this past weekned, stupid me should have tried this before inviting guests to dinner! We have a gas convection oven and I checked websites and books and all concurred that you should convection cook a turkey at 300 degrees for less time than a regular oven at 325. Well we had a 17.3 lb bird and convect cooked it for 2.5 hours just as the cooking table said. The breast was beautifully cooked but the legs, thighs, wings weren't - basically the whole bottom of the turkey. We ended up cutting off the breasts then putting the rest of the bird back in the oven to finish cooking. Used a metal roasting pan about 3.5" to 4" deep and did roasted potatoes with it. So can anybody tell this dummy what I did wrong? Why the bottom of my bird didn't cook? Should I have used a shallower roaster, lifted the bird in the roaster, not added the potatoes? All help appreciated so that I don't do it again! Thanks!!!!

  2. #2
    Convection cooking works by the air can circulating around the food being cooked, so because the lower half of the bird wasn't exposed to the circulating air because it was surrounded by potatoes, it didn't cook at the same rate as the rest of it. Try using a pan that lifts the bird so that this circulation does occur. Also, I never go by the cooking timetables on poultry. I use a probe thermometer which is much more accurate.

    Good luck with your next roast!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    82
    The pan was definitely my thought as to why it happened. I told DH that next time we'll elevate the turkey so that the air could circulate. But on a good note, we tried brining the bird for the first time too and it really does make a difference in the texture of mosture level of the bird. Very yummy! Even the leftovers that we've been munching on for the past few nights have a much better texture and flavor than with non-brined birds.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    7,874
    I brined my thanksgiving turkey last year, and it was the most tender roast turkey I have ever made. I am sure I will do something similar this year, but I have not yet decided what.
    “When one door of happiness closes, another opens; but often we look so long at the closed
    door that we do not see the one which has been opened for us.”

    Helen Keller (1880–1968)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    SO. CA
    Posts
    2,228
    I have Electric Convection. In the instruction book it tells you to reduce the heat by 25 for convection, BUT in the supplied recipies,
    it suggests 325 for poultry. My oven came with a broiler/roasting pan, that is what I use. The turkey sits on the rack, and the air circulates around and under it. The best thing is NO BASTING, AND NO COVERING IT! My roasts and turkeys usually get done in less time that the suggested time! I always use an instant read thermometer, check between the leg and body for temperature.
    Curleytop

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    752
    2.5 hours is not long enough for a 17 pound bird.
    Karen

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Waterford, MI
    Posts
    2,331
    I just got a duel fuel with electric convection and am planning on doing thanksgiving here, I am not sure what kind of pan to use, I usually use a regular roasting pan with a flat rack in it. I don't know how well that would elevate it. What do you all recommend? Also, does it make a difference if the bird is stuffed (other than the cook time)?

    Also, I have heard of brining the turkey (alton brown), how exactly did you do it and for how long, raw meat scares me so I was not sure how I could manage to brine a whole turkey. Just wanted to know how you did it and how hard was it?

    TIA

    Lisa

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    752
    I did ours last year in a regular ol roasting pan one that I've had for eons on a v rack. If I can quickly find the picture, I'll include it..this was the transfer pan, not the roasting pan, but that rack its in the other about 3 - 4 inch sides. I would guess that this was cooked at 325 for around 4 hours.
    If you go to

    http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cooksta...Reading+%3E%3E

    http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cooksta...Reading+%3E%3E

    http://forums.taunton.com/tp-cooksta...Reading+%3E%3E

    There are excellent articles about brining. In case it didn't work, its the taunton forums (fine cooking), tried and true folder.
    Karen

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    82
    Here's the brine recipe we used: Turkey Brine

    It's from a live cooking show on FoodTV Canada. We watched the show last December and were really impressed with the method so were looking for an opportunity to use it. We brined our bird in a cooler, as we didn't have anything else big enough to fit it. We used I think triple or quadruple the recipe because of the size of the cooler, but ran out of sugar so only used what we had. We brined ours four about 16 hours. We also used sea salt.

    The cooking guidelines we followed for our turkey came from the Ohio Poultry Association: Ohio Poultry Association Turkey Guidelines

    But we'll definitely use a different rack and pan next time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Waterford, MI
    Posts
    2,331
    Did you clean out the cooler after or dispose of it? Did you put Ice to keep it cool for 16 hours? thanks for the info.

    Lisa

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    82
    We scrubbed the cooler, top, outside and inside with scalding hot water and detergent to rid it of any germs. After we dumped the used brine we did the same, scrubbed it squeaky clean. We added ice from our icemaker to the cooler, not sure how many cups but the ice came up to about the 3/4 mark on the 4L stockpot we were mixing the brine in before dumping in the cooler. The bird was just fine in the cooler, the brine was still quite cold when we took it out, I certainly froze my hands when I was washing the brine off the turkey!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    northern california
    Posts
    752
    food bucket in the cooler surrounded by ice. I know some that have used garbage bags or large plastic bags.
    Karen

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •