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Thread: Quick Cooking Vs Regular Oatmeal

  1. #1
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    Question Quick Cooking Vs Regular Oatmeal

    What is the difference between quick cooking and regular oatmeal? I know that quick cooking is smaller and cooks faster, but are there any health differences? I like the texture of quick cooking better, but someone told me it wasn't as healthy as the regular. Is that true?

  2. #2
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    Quick-cooking oatmeal is steamed and pressed, and loses some of its fiber in the process.

  3. #3
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    I don't have the info here in front of me, but according to the new EW articles Razing the pyramid and the article on glycemic index the quick cooking is much worse for you. It has been processed enough that it breaks down like sugar and evidently retains little nutritional value that your body can use.

    Pam

  4. #4
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    all oatmeal has been "processed" from the oat-groat (which looks a little smaller than a wheatberry). The only difference between the "old-fashioned" and the quick cooking is how often it has gone through the roller..and been flattened. Yes, the quick cooking will have a higher glycemic index because it has more surface area and hydrates faster (if you're looking at equal times of cooking), but the difference, in my opinion isn't significant if you cook it to a mush texture whether it's the quick kind or the old fashioned style.
    Thoreau said, 'A man is rich in proportion to the things he can leave alone.'

  5. #5
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    Quick oats are cut smaller. The stuff in little bags has all kinds of additional crap in it. I make a mix which I take to work because it cooks with just the boiled water from our water dispenser.

    1/3 cup plain quick oats
    1 tblsp. unprocessed bran
    1/2 tsp. brown sugar
    sprinkle of cinnamon
    pinch of salt (very important)
    dried craisins or cut up dried apricots (use whatever you like)

    Place in a coffee mug or small bowl. Add enough water to cover by about 1/2". This is not an exact measurement. Stir to combine and let sit for about 5 minutes (covered with a napkin or something). Stir again and if it's not loose enough for you, add a dab more water.

    This is much better for you than the bagged flavored oatmeal.
    "There's no food in your food!!" Joan Cusack to John Cusack in "Say Anything."

  6. #6
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    I have a round carton of both the old fashioned oats and the quick oats. The nutritional info is identical (fiber, calories, etc.). The glycemic index is different, but that, of course, isn't reported on the container.

  7. #7
    Originally posted by valchemist
    I have a round carton of both the old fashioned oats and the quick oats. The nutritional info is identical (fiber, calories, etc.). The glycemic index is different, but that, of course, isn't reported on the container.
    Great. Baked potatoes are bad and now, my beloved packets of flavored Quaker Oats are bad too. . I thought eating a packet of oatmeal every morning was healthy.

  8. #8
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    I love the Quaker Nutrition for Women Vanilla Cinnamon. I mean I really love that stuff!!! It is so sweet and sugar-y that I treat it like a dessert. I have two packets every day.

    That is actually the thing I will miss most when I go on my "sugar free kick" starting in about two weeks.

    editing...
    I know, it is hard to believe that I would miss those more than my baking, but I think that I will miss them more because they are a such a habit for me.

  9. #9
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    Er, um, I think some of us may be confusing two different kinds of "quick" oatmeal. Quick-cooking oatmeal is smaller/thinner cut oats that still need to be cooked, but for a shorter period of time than the coarser cut oats. The oatmeal that comes in "packets" or that just needs to be steeped in boiling water is instant oatmeal, which has had most of the nutrition and texture (and, I think, taste) processed out of it. The quick-cooking stuff is still real oatmeal; I'm not so sure about the instant.

    Cheers,
    Phoebe

  10. #10
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    nope, I am not confusing anything. that's exactly what I was saying...

    the whole oats and the quick cooking oats have the same nutrition.

    the sugar packet oatmeal is a whole different story.

  11. #11
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    transfats in oatmeal?

    While we're on the subject of oatmeal, something has been puzzling me--and not in a good way. In the nutrition analysis on the Old Fashioned Quaker Oats package it lists 3 grams of fat per serving. It's broken down as saturated .5g, polyunsaturated 1g, monosaturated 1g. This only adds up to 2.5 grams, so what about the other .5g? As I understand it, it has to be transfats as there is no other kind left. The only ingredient is whole grain rolled oats, and it says 100% natural on the package. Are there transfats in old fashioned oatmeal? If so, where does it come from, and if not, what is that remaining half gram of fat? Does anyone know anything about this?

  12. #12
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    The difference is probably due to rounding. For example, if the polyunsaturated and monunsaturated fats were 1.2g each, they would be shown as 1g (rounding to the nearest whole or half gram.) The total fat would then be 2.9g, which would be rounded to 3g.
    Laurie

    Vizzini: He didn't fall?! Inconceivable!
    Inigo: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

  13. #13
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    A few years ago I was preparing a recipe and had only regular oats, not the quick-cooking, which was what the recipe called for. I telephoned the Quaker Oats Company and the rep told me to just put the regular oats in a food processor or blender and give it a few quick pulses to chop up the flakes a bit. I've been doing that ever since, it works fine, and I only need to buy the regular oats now.
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Dewey
    The difference is probably due to rounding. For example, if the polyunsaturated and monunsaturated fats were 1.2g each, they would be shown as 1g (rounding to the nearest whole or half gram.) The total fat would then be 2.9g, which would be rounded to 3g.
    Thanks, Laurie. That's reassuring about the oatmeal, but I guess it's even harder to figure out whether there are transfats than I thought it was.

  15. #15
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    Maybe someone else here knows this (or we could do a search, but I have to run upstairs and pull my breadout of the oven soon ) but I think that if the ingredients have the words "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" then the product has trans-fats. But I may be completely wrong! Got to run, the timer's beeping!
    Laurie

    Vizzini: He didn't fall?! Inconceivable!
    Inigo: You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.

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