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Thread: Malt powder????

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Victoria, B. C. Canada
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    Malt powder????

    I would like to make the chocolate malt ice cream and I am wondering if I could use powdered malt from the health food store. It says "a product derived from barley". The only other "malt" I can find in Victoria, Canada is Ovaltine malt drink. Carnation malt powder is not sold here. Do you think this would work? TIA

    Maureen

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Danvers, MA
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    6,925
    I know you can order malt from King Arthur Flour. Do they ship to Canada?

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Victoria, B. C. Canada
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    Thanks Loren...I just checked their website and it doesn't look like they ship to Canada. They only show each state as a choice for shipping. The $3.95 for a pound of malted milk powder is a good price though.

    Maureen

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    The powdered malt from the health food store should be the thing. Don't know about BC, but here malt powder is also sold at baking/bulk stores.

    Ovaltine, incidentally, does have the right flavour, as long as it's not the chocolate kind. I like Ovaltine.

  5. #5
    Actually, I think they are different things. I *think* the kind that you use in ice cream is Carnation or Ovaltine Malted MILK powder. I *think* the kind from the health food store is a diastolic malt powder or some other malt derivative that does not have milk. AD or somebody posted the definitions awhile back. I can only tell you that the one I use is called malted milk powder.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
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    4,211
    Claire gets the prize, and I get the booby prize --
    Cooks' Thesaurus:
    malt powder = malt flour
    Notes: You can make malt powder by allowing whole grains to sprout briefly, drying them, and then grinding them into a powder. Commercial malt powders are usually made with barley, and they're used extensively by commercial bakers. There are two main types of malt powder: diastatic and non-diastatic. Diastatic malt contains active enzymes which help break starch down into sugar. The extra sugar feeds the yeast in the dough, helping the bread to rise, and also gives the bread a browner crust. It's often used to make crusty breads. Non-diastatic malt doesn't have active enzymes, but it gives baked goods better flavor and a shinier, browner crust. It's used in everything from bagels to croissants to breakfast cereals. Don't confuse malt powder with malted milk powder, which also contains powdered milk and wheat flour and is used to make beverages. Look for malt powder in health food stores or baking supply stores.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Victoria, B. C. Canada
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    2,034
    Thanks everyone. After buying this I did some more research and came to the same conclusion. Oh well will try it in baking I guess and will go and get some regular Ovaltine for my malted MILK powder. Thanks again.

    Maureen

  8. #8
    Originally posted by lonetree1353
    Thanks everyone. After buying this I did some more research and came to the same conclusion. Oh well will try it in baking I guess and will go and get some regular Ovaltine for my malted MILK powder. Thanks again.

    Maureen
    Maureen,

    I think lots of bagel recipes use that kind of malt powder. Maybe you could make bagels?

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