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Thread: Whipped Evaporated Milk?

  1. #1
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    Question Whipped Evaporated Milk?

    I just posted a recipe in my other thread that calls for whipping a can of evaporated milk. I'd never heard of doing this! I haven't tried whipping evaporated SKIM milk yet to sub in either. I don't know if it would even whip! This can't be a new thing as this is a rather old recipe (Lemon-Angel Dessert) - *I'm* just new
    In the recipe it makes the dessert sort of like souffle-ish as it is folded in with a gelatin mixture. (and it is sooo yummy IMO!) But what do we do now a days? Is this where we mostly use cool whip or ..... what? I've not ventured out in experimenting yet but I am absolutely sure somebody can help to clue me in. Anything to help make my new favorite recipe lighter in calories!
    TIA!
    ~katie

  2. #2
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    Katie,

    I've been wondering if you can whip fat-free evaporated milk too and I know it's a sub for whipping cream. I did see this somewhere. Oh, here it is (from foodsubs.com):

    whipped cream
    Substitutes: With chilled beaters and a chilled bowl, whip 12 ounces of very well-chilled evaporated milk and serve immediately. If you wish, add up to 2 tablespoons chilled lemon juice to milk before beating. (This substitute doesn't taste as rich, but is lower in fat and calories.) OR pressurized whipped cream topping (more convenient, but it's more expensive and doesn't taste as good) OR frozen yogurt (lower in fat) OR well-drained vanilla yogurt (lower in fat) OR (as topping for hot chocolate) marshmallows (lower in fat) OR nondairy whipped cream substitute (Check the labels. A popular brand of this is very high in saturated fat.) Links: See the Recipesource.com posting for Mock Whipped Cream.


    Has anyone tried whipping evaporated milk?
    Adele

    My Blog - http://passioknit.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
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    I found this little gadget a while back at Restoration Hardware. Their website doesn't seem to know about it anymore so I did a search and came up with this.

    http://www.aerolatte.biz/indexs.html

    It says it will whip fresh full fat, semi-skimmed, and skimmed milks. The fuller the milk the longer the froth will remain. Also it will froth goat's, sheep's and Soya milk as well as UHT (what is that?) and powdered milk.

    I don't see why it wouldn't froth evaportated milks.

    Sorry about the link, I don't know how to post links or pictures.
    I think this cost $20 at Restoration Hardware.

  4. #4
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    Yep, you sure can whip evap. skim or regular milk. Just chill your bowl and beaters and make sure the evap. milk is cold.

    However, it will deflate, if not used quickly or folded into a gelatin. One way to lengthen it's usable time and to add some flavor and body, is to add 1-2 tablespoons of instant vanilla pudding. Partially whip the milk and as soft peaks begin to form, lightly spinkle in the pudding mix while continuing to whip. Whip until the peaks become firm.

    By the way, this technique can be used for regular whipped cream as well. It will stablize and hold whipped cream for several days. Also it's great to use when icing a cake with whipped cream.


    Renée
    Happiness is a good piece of chocolate and a good cup of coffee.

  5. #5
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    Thanks Renee, this opens up a whole new world of desserts I've avoided due to whipping cream. Cheers!
    Adele

    My Blog - http://passioknit.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by ReneeV
    Yep, you sure can whip evap. skim or regular milk. Just chill your bowl and beaters and make sure the evap. milk is cold.

    However, it will deflate, if not used quickly or folded into a gelatin. One way to lengthen it's usable time and to add some flavor and body, is to add 1-2 tablespoons of instant vanilla pudding. Partially whip the milk and as soft peaks begin to form, lightly spinkle in the pudding mix while continuing to whip. Whip until the peaks become firm.

    By the way, this technique can be used for regular whipped cream as well. It will stablize and hold whipped cream for several days. Also it's great to use when icing a cake with whipped cream.


    Renée
    Is using the pudding kind of the same thing as using unflavored gelatin to stabilize whipped cream icing?

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  7. #7
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    My package of nonfat dry milk had instructions for whipping it. That was the first time I had seen that, but I still haven't tried it.

  8. #8
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    UHT milk is ultra high temperature pasturised (sp?) milk and is shelf stable. Parmalat makes a brand that is sold in a box and can be found with the baked goods or the soy milk. I don't think its chemically any different from regular milk though so its funny that they specified that the gadget would work on UHT milk.

  9. #9
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    Making this recipe was the first time I'd ever heard of whipping evaporated milk. It works great. But it's even better to know that nonfat can be used just as well. And using it to sub for real whipping cream? - I like that! I'll be doing that in the near future.
    Thanks for the pudding tip as well!

    Here's the dessert recipe that has the whipped evaporated milk:
    (yeah, I'm being redundant! --it's on another thread)

    Raspberry Lemon-Angel Dessert

    1/2 c sugar
    1 envelope unflavored gelatin
    dash of salt
    2 eggs, beaten
    1/2 c water
    6-ounce can frozen rasp lemonade concentrate, thawed
    food coloring (yellow), optional
    14 1/2 ounce can evaporated milk, chilled
    10-inch angel food cake, baked and cooled
    a few fresh raspberries

    Recipe says to make this in a 10-inch tube pan, chill, and then unmold. But I've found that making like a trifle in a punch bowl (or trifle bowl) really works well. Probably almost any pan would work. Even a 9x13, 9x5 loaf pan, or such, although haven't tried that yet.
    Also this recipe was originally just plain lemon (explains the yellow food coloring) but to us the raspberry lemonade plus berries was just better/sweeter and prettier than plain.

    In small saucepan mix sugar, gelatin, salt. Add beaten eggs and water. Cook and stir until gelatin dissolves and mixture thickens slightly. Remove from heat; stir in lemonade concentrate and food coloring (if desired). Chill till just partially set.

    In large chilled bowl whip evaporated milk. Fold into gelatin mixture.

    Rub brown crumbs off of angel food cake and discard. Only want white pretty cake. Tear or cut cake into bite-size pieces. Actually - using less than a whole cake is best. It gets a little too dry with all the cake.
    Cover bottom of pan with thin layer of gelatin mixture. Arrange 1/3 of cake then pour or spoon 1/3 of gelatin over cake. Repeat twice. Chill until firm and set. Unmold if in tube pan.
    serves 12

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the recipe. Can't wait to try this.

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