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Thread: thin crispy pizza crust

  1. #1
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    Question thin crispy pizza crust

    I've done a search on pizza crusts and got many posts for both a "doughy" crust and "thin" crust. I'm not sure if I found the answer or not.

    I'm looking for a recipe that makes a CRISP, THIN pizza crust. My DH prefers them to the "doughy" crusts. Any favorite recipes (both white and whole wheat) and methods. (I would think the method is more important than the ingredients, but I may be wrong?)

    Thanks.
    Shirley

  2. #2
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    If you like a thin, really crispy crust, use less oil. We use maybe 2 tsp per large crust and make a thin, little crispy crust. You can use even less, but we thought it got a little too much like a cracker crust. This is with a sourdough crust, which is what we usually make. The dough is naturally soft, and I am not sure whether a plain dough would react the same to the added oil.

    Flour can make a difference too. KA has some specialty flours that are recommended for pizza -- You could talk to them about trying a flour that makes a crispier pizza crust (I had that conversation once, but I can't remember which flour it was -- they recommended one for deep dish crusts and another one for thin crust).

  3. #3
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    AND bake it very hot -- 500 -- and on either one of those perforated pizza pans or a baking stone. That's how I get a crispy crust. The dough I use is very low in fat, but I've found it gets soggy even so, if I use a regular pizza pan.

    Oh, and my recipe includes some semolina flour. Crescent Dragonwagon assures me that this gives more "tooth" to the crust.

  4. #4
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    I should have also added not to over-top the pizza, especially with cold ingredients. If you bring them to room temp, the pizza will bake better-- especially in the center. That thin brushing of the dough before you put on suace and toppings also makes a moisture barrier and helps keep the crust from getting soggy. I use a stone -- usually at 450. My oven seemed to get too hot at 500, but this oven is on it's way out anyway.

  5. #5
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    Originally posted by CompassRose
    Oh, and my recipe includes some semolina flour. Crescent Dragonwagon assures me that this gives more "tooth" to the crust.
    KA has a good pizza dough recipe on their website with semolina - 1 cup semolina to 3 1/2 cups AP flour I think.

    I've used both the KA recipe and my "usual" crust (which combines AP and bread flour) and I agree that the semolina makes a crispier all-around crust. It depends on what you like. You can make any crust crispy on the bottom with the right equipment (i.e. stone or perforated pan) and rolling/shaping the dough thinly to start with.

    My "usual" crust is softer in the breadier/puffier part around the edge but still very crispy on the bottom because I use a preheated PC stone and slide my pizza on it from a peel. The semolina crust is crispier around the puffy edges but if you don't leave a lot of "puff" around the edges to start with, the edges will be crispy with most any dough.

    Pizza is a very personal food!

    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  6. #6
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    Beth and Gracie,
    Maybe I'm a little foggy this morning, but who is "KA"?

    Thanks.
    Shirley

  7. #7
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    KA is King Arthur. They make flour which may be available to you locally, and if not, it's available from their catalog and website at www.kingarthurflour.com

    They make VERY high quality flours, and have many, many different types of flours (high gluten, low gluten, and a whole host of others).

  8. #8
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    Nevermind, I just realized KA was King Arthur. Like I said, I'm a big foggy this morning.


    Shirley

  9. #9
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    Cook's Illustrated has a fantastic recipe for thin, crispy crust. I printed it several weeks ago; I'll go and find it or you can search on my username. The technique is really more important I think; it's essential you preheat your oven AND stone for an hour at 500 degrees before putting the crust on the stone. Their method for rolling out is fantastic. My DH is from NJ and will only eat thin, crackly crust pizza. This one is a winner, for sure! And super easy.
    Lynne


    To err is human, to forgive, canine.
    -- Anonymous

  10. #10
    Ignorant question here: what does a baking stone look like?

  11. #11
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    Like this:



    They're available all over the place - Williams-Sonoma, Department stores, all over the web, Pampered Chef, etc.

  12. #12
    Loren, you are so computer-smart

  13. #13
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    Thanks - but Loren is "gracie" (which is the name of her cat) - I'm actually Grace!!

  14. #14
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    Loren
    The term "working mother" is redundant.

  15. #15
    Whoa-- big news to me! I've been mixing you both up for over a year now!

  16. #16
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    If you are going to go looking for a pizza or baking stone, get the rectangular kind pictured above. The round ones are not practical for sliding an unbaked pizza of any size onto or off of.

  17. #17
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    Another recommendation for a baking stone. Sweetheart and I have made our own pizzas for quite a while, but they got dramatically better when we started using the stone. As Beth said, get the rectangular one. I wouldn't want to be without mine now!

  18. #18
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    Thanks Golden,
    I searched using your username and found the recipe you posted. I will definitely have to try this! Do you think I can substitute "wax" paper for parchment? I use wax paper for rolling out pie dough, and have that on hand.

    Beth (and others),
    I will buy a pizza/baking stone. Other than rectangular (vs circular), is that anything else we need to look for? Are some brands better than others? I read where one person's stone cracked after sitting for an hour in a 500 degree oven.

    Shirley

  19. #19
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    Shirley, I'm not Golden, but I will say I would not recommend substituting wax paper for parchment. Wax paper is coated with wax, which melts in the oven, and is not designed to hold up to high oven temperatures. Parchment is coated with silicone, and is meant for the hot oven. It's so versatile though, I think you'll like having it for making cookies, and lots of other things. Worth buying, IMO.

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