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Thread: Faux Finish: Ragging On w/plastic bags..

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Greensburg PA USA
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    199

    Faux Finish: Ragging On w/plastic bags..

    Anyone faux finish by ragging on paint or paint/glaze using plastic grocery bags??

    A friend did this in her dining room & it looked awesome..

    I am redoing my bedroom & have the base coat on & now it's time f/the fun part...

    I've never done it before...but it doesn't seem TOO difficult!
    If anyone can offer tips, I'd appreciate it...

    TIA
    Jonie

  2. #2
    i did ragging OFF with an old t-shirt.

    if you go to home depot or lowes they will have free faux finish instructional booklets in the paint aisle... often next to any faux finishing tools they may carry (like rakes or rag mittens).

    this was years ago, but basically i painted my wall all one color, then mixed the paint with a glaze substance. the glaze stuff makes the top layer of paint a little more translucent and also slows the drying time to allow you to work with it. then i painted on the top layer, took an old t-shirt and smooshed it up in a ball and then pressed it against the wall. the fabric removes some of the top layer paint revealing the basecoat color and this creating a nice ragging pattern.

    i actually tried using saran wrap (which is similar to plastic bags) instead of the t-shirt and felt it was harder to work with.

    good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Reno, NV
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    My Mom and I did this in a bedroom in her house and it turned out great! Actually, we did the opposite - we ragged off. We found it gave a more subtle effect and it was MUCH easier to get it uniform-looking. Ragging on was more difficult to get it uniform becuase you had to be more careful about how much paint you got on the bag and how much pressure you applied (we tried both).

    All we did was paint one color and let it dry. Then we mixed the glaze with the second paint color and rolled it on in small patches and ragged it off with the bags. It works best if you have one person to roll it on and another person to do the ragging-off. Do small sections at a time and be careful not to let the edges of the section you're working on dry before starting the next section or it won't blend as well. The big thing we learned was to be careful of the print on the bags. We just used the plastic bags you get your groceries in they had the name of the store on the outside of the bag in red. The color came off in the paint and onto the walls! So turn the bags inside out of they have printing on them!

    Once you get the hang of it it's really easy and it looks great! Happy painting!

    Lisa

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Greensburg PA USA
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    I looked thru those brochures I picked up from Sherwin Williams..
    Funny, I thought ragging OFF looked more difficult!

    I am going f/a "beach" look... I used all the colors off a paint card from S/W... of course what THEY call the colors has nothing to do w/what they actually look like.. wouldn't you love to be the person who has to think up a new name f/"aqua"?!?!

    So my base coat is a satin finish aqua-y type color.. the 1st color to rag on is a lighter creamy color & I am going to apply a 2nd color over top that, & that color is about a shade or 2 lighter than my base coat...

    My best friend did my bathroom f/me several years ago.. ( she painted, I made lunch!)... & she used 3 different glazes that she applied w/feather dusters! It's bee-you-tee-ful! I get alot of comments on that...

    I figure if I can't rag, I could always use the feather duster technique..

    Thanx again f/sharing your experience

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
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    Texas
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    I have this book on faux painting that calls for painting sections of a wall then covering with sheets of plastic and then peeling off to give a faux leather look very cool looking in red or brown!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Rensselaer, NY
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    Originally posted by sneezles
    I have this book on faux painting that calls for painting sections of a wall then covering with sheets of plastic and then peeling off to give a faux leather look very cool looking in red or brown!
    I rented a vacation house once that had a game room with faux leather painted walls. I agree that it is really cool looking! I always wondered how the person got it to look that way.

    As for ragging on vs. ragging off, I agree that ragging off does provide a more subtle contrast between your colors and is easier to do. It can be hard, as others said, to control the amount of paint you're ragging ON to your walls, and if you add too much, you have to try and get some off, but in removing some paint, it tends to just blend into the base color rather than simply lifting off the wall, so you wind up with a more blended look than you may have wanted. Did that even make sense? Anyway, the most important thing to remember is to not work in too large of an area at a time, or else one area will start to dry too much before you can work your surrounding areas into it.

    Kari

  7. #7
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    Northern VA
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    Originally posted by nixmom
    My Mom and I did this in a bedroom in her house and it turned out great! Actually, we did the opposite - we ragged off. We found it gave a more subtle effect and it was MUCH easier to get it uniform-looking. Ragging on was more difficult to get it uniform becuase you had to be more careful about how much paint you got on the bag and how much pressure you applied (we tried both).

    All we did was paint one color and let it dry. Then we mixed the glaze with the second paint color and rolled it on in small patches and ragged it off with the bags. It works best if you have one person to roll it on and another person to do the ragging-off. Do small sections at a time and be careful not to let the edges of the section you're working on dry before starting the next section or it won't blend as well.
    Lisa
    We did this in our family room with strong paper rags we got from Home Depot. We also added a third layer of a contrast color, leaving very little on. It gave it some depth. It looks great and was so much fun to do!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    PA
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    Anyway, the most important thing to remember is to not work in too large of an area at a time, or else one area will start to dry too much before you can work your surrounding areas into it.
    I'd also recommend starting behind a door or an area that you don't see right away - just in case it takes you a while to get the hang of it... I did our bathroom ragging on with an old tshirt. I had to repaint the area behind the door 2 times before I got the look I wanted and was able to reproduce it It looks beautiful!!
    Charisse

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