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Thread: Gordita -style tortilla?

  1. #1
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    Gordita -style tortilla?

    Does anyone know how to make a gordita-style tortilla? Is it just a thicker tortilla?
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  2. #2
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    I think it is just bigger, not thicker.

    I found this recipe on the Quaker website, http://www.tortillamix.com/Recipes/gorditas-tm.htm .


    Gorditas


    Gorditas are a saucer-shaped bread that can be served open-faced or like a sandwich

    Prep time: 5 minutes
    Cook time: 20 minutes

    2 cups Quaker® Masa Harina de Maíz
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    2 tablespoons shortening
    1-1/2 cups warm water
    1/4 cup vegetable oil
    2 cups assorted toppings such as prepared shredded beef or pork, chorizo (Mexican sausage), Mexican style cheese (i.e. Chihuahua or Monterey Jack cheese), fresh chopped tomatoes and lettuce.




    Heat griddle to medium heat (375°F).

    To make the gorditas, combine masa, all-purpose flour, baking powder and salt. Add shortening and water. Knead until all ingredients are well blended and you are able to form a ball. Divide dough into 14 balls. Keep dough covered. Using a rolling pin, a tortilla press, or your hands, press each ball between 2 plastic bags to form a circle (or a disk) that has a 5-inch diameter and is 1/4-inch thick.

    To form and cook the gorditas, lay gordita on preheated griddle. Cook each side for 2 to 3 minutes or until lightly browned. While still warm, pinch edge to form a 1-inch rim. The gordita should resemble a small saucer.

    Preheat oven to 150°F. Line a 9x13-inch baking pan with several layers of paper towels. Set aside.

    To fry gorditas, use a large (8" to 10") frying pan. Heat 1/4 cup vegetable oil and fry 2 to 3 gorditas at a time for 1 to 2 minutes, turning frequently, until the two sides are lightly brown and crisp. Place fried gorditas in prepared baking pan and placed in preheated oven to keep warm.

    To top and serve gorditas, spoon about 2 to 3 tablespoons of prepared shredded beef or pork, chorizo (Mexican sausage), Mexican style cheese (i.e. Chihuahua or Monterey Jack cheese), fresh chopped tomatoes and lettuce or your favorite topping. Serve warm.
    Yield: 5 servings

  3. #3
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    THANK YOU!!
    I'm going to try them as is and then see how much fat I can cut out and still have them work out.

    I'm pretty sure that gorditas are thicker than regular tortillas. At least they are thicker than the tortillas that I make. It says 1/4 inch thick.
    I'm excited to try these! Thank you, again!!
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  4. #4

    Cool

    First off, that's going to depend where you get the gorditas. Some places call them gorditas, but I don't think they really are...

    I'm going to give you two recipes, both of which are slightly different. Like the one above, it's going to be basically a fried masa dough, but the ingredients are different.

    GORDITAS
    (Corn flour Patties)

    It is nearly impossible to walk more than a block in any Mexican neighborhood in the United Sates without encountering a food vendor or two with a stand on the street. Even in Spanish Harlem in Manhattan, there is a community of women who sell freshly fried gorditas ("little fatties") from little carts on 116th Street. Gorditas are standard snack fare; the best way to make them is with your hands.

    2 cups masa harina
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon baking powder
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    Canola oil for frying
    Filling (if you want chicken filling recipe, let me know)
    1/2 cup grated queso Cotija or queso Añejo

    Mix the masa, flour, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. Gradually add 1 1/2 cups of warm water; you may need to add a little more to make a moist smooth dough. Form the dough into walnut-size balls and cover with a damp towel as you work to prevent them from drying out.

    Moisten a cloth napkin or tea towel and spread out on a flat surface. Roll each ball of dough in the moistened palm of your hand until smooth, lay one on the damp towel, cover with plastic wrap, and press down with your hand to flatten to the size of a silver dollar. To shape the patty, flatten it again with a small can or flat-bottomed glass into a perfectly smooth circle 2 to 2 1/2 inches in diameter and about 1/4 inch thick. Peel the plastic off, then lay the tortilla in your hand and peel away the damp cloth. Smooth any rough edges with your fingers and the patty is ready to fry. Repeat with the remaining balls of dough, keeping the patties covered with a towel as you work.

    In a wide pot or deep skillet, heat 2 inches of oil to 375ºF. (Check the temperature with an instant-read thermometer or spring some masa in the hot oil, it it sizzles, the oil is ready.) Carefully slide the patties into the hot oil and fry until the are puffed and crisp, turning to brown evenly, about 5 minutes. Remove to a platter lined with paper towel to drain and sprinkle with salt to taste. Make a slit on the side of each gordita as sonn as they are cool enough to handle. Stuff a couple of tablespoons of filling inside and garnish with grated cheese.

    (From: La Comida del Barrio)

    GORDITAS INFLADAS
    (Fried puffed tortillas)

    Veracruz's answer to the Indian Puri is the Gordita inflada (literally, "Puffed-up little fat one"). In talking about them, most people leave out the inflada, which can be confusing, since the name gordita by itself refers to a motley family of different tortilla-like masa cakes. They are eaten in some form or other in many parts of Mexico, but everyone knows that Veracruz state is headquarters for the most varied and delicious gorditas.
    Some gordita variations, such as tapaditas, have filling, but gorditas infladas are not meant to be filled.
    You mayhink that getting a gordita inflada to inflate takes aeons of practice. Not so. If the oil is at the right temperature and you have a large spoon handy to keep flicking the hot fat over the upper surface, they'll puff as if by magic. The following dough is for basic gorditas infladas as commonly made around the port city and the Sotavento region. It uses a combination fo masa, wheat flour, and mashed plantain that produces a pliable, subtly flavored, and easily puffed dough. The cooks of the region often shape their gorditas by hand into rounded ovals, which does take a little extra skill; I've opted for round ones made with a tortilla press.
    Please note that the recipe calls for a chunk of plantain at the last stage of ripeness, black and thoroughly softened. If you have to use one that is still a little hard and starchy, soften it as follows: Increase the amount of milk to 1/2 cup and simmer the sliced plantain in the milk in a small saucepan for about 15 minutes. Let cool and proceed as directed below:


    1/4 large ripe plantain, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch slices
    1/4 cup milk
    1 pound masa, fresh or reconstituted by mixing 2 cups masa harina with about 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water
    1/4 - 1/2 cup all-purpose flour, or more as necessary
    1/2 - 3/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
    Vegetable oil for frying

    Puree the plantain with the milk in a blender. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the mixture with the masa, 1/4 cup of the flour, and 1/2 teaspoon of the salt. With your hands, mix the ingredients into a dough, working in more flour 1/2 tablespoon at a time just until it has a smooth, somewhat pliable but firm consistency. Taste for salt and work in a little more if desired.
    Shape the dough into about 12 balls the size of Ping-Pong balls and keep them covered with a damp cloth as you work. Following the directions on page 115, press out each ball of dough into a 5-inch round, and place on baking sheets lined with parchments or waxed paper.
    Pour oil into a deep-fryer or deep, heavy skillet to a depth of 1 - 1 1/2 inches and heat oven a medium-high heat to 375º F, or until a morsel of dough sizzles on contact. Have ready a large cooking spoon and a skimmer or slotted spatula. Line a large baking sheet with paper towels. Slip the gorditas into the oil over it to make it puff evenly. Fry, without turning, for 20 - 25 seconds; it should be no darker than slightly golden. Turn and fly for 10 - 15 seconds more. At once lift out with the skimmer, letting as much oil as possible drain back into the pot and set on the prepared baking sheet. Watch the temperature carefully as you work, and adjust the heat as necessary to maintain the oil at 375º F.
    It's impossible to predict just how long it will take a gordita inflada to deflate. But they wil be at their tenderest and most irrestible if eaten hot, hot, hot, as they come out of the pan.

    Gail Note: I realize I didn't include instructions alluded to above and will be happy to do so, if someone wants them. Zarela also gives variations for sweet gorditas, anise gorditas and bean filled gorditas.

    (From: Zarela's Veracruz)

  5. #5
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    I just got done trying the first recipe posted.
    I hate to admit this, but the gordita that I am trying to duplicate is the one from Taco Bell. That's the only kind I've had and I do like them.
    And, it's actually just the "wrap" that I'm trying to make.

    After looking at the recipe I figured that the amount of masa would be too much for the flavor and texture that I remember. So, I did half masa/half flour. While they were tasty, they were still too "grainy" and didn't have the chewiness that I want. I'm thinking about trying this recipe again with all flour and no masa.

    Gail, your recipes look wonderful. I'm saving them because they do look like something I'd like to try. Yours look very authentic and not quite what I'm looking for.

    But, I'm wondering if anyone has a recipe for what I'm looking for?? Maybe they really aren't "gorditas" even though that's what Taco Bell calls them? Or maybe they are just so Americanized that they can't even be considered a gordita?
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  6. #6

    Cool

    Umm hmm.

    This is why I put that first sentence-- in case you were thinking Taco Bell. When Taco Bell first came out with those, I remember thinking they weren't really gorditas. First off, your problem is that what Taco Bell serves are flour, not masa. Let me check something and I'll be back.

    Here's a little more unofficial information:


    Gordita
    A Mexican food item. A thick, soft tortilla, bent into a U-shape, heated (perhaps lightly deep fried?) and then filled like a taco and served while still warm. A very similar result can be obtained by using a round pita bread instead. The Taco Bell Mexican food fast food chain offers a variety of gorditas with different fillings.
    Although all descriptions of gorditas specify using a corn tortilla, photographs of Taco Bell's gorditas appear to show a thick, soft tortilla, implying the use of a flour tortilla rather than a corn tortilla. I cannot explain this apparent contradiction.

    Some gorditas appear to have a normal crispy taco shell inside the outer soft shell.

    I received an email message saying:

    A gordita is, despite Taco Bell's attempt to convince people otherwise, not made with a pita bread. A proper gordita is a fried corn-meal "pocket" into which meat, beans, cheese, etc. is placed.
    I received another email saying that:
    Chalupas are almost certainly a Taco Bell invention and are gorditas where the shell has been deep fried.
    I've tried Taco Bell's chalupas (and can very highly recommend them) but I haven't yet tried a gordita. The difference between a chalupa and a gordita at Taco Bell appears to be a very subtle one to me.

    ---

    Both chalupas and gorditas do exist in certain areas of Mexico, however both are masa items, not flour. The flour thing, I think, is a Taco Bell Americanization.

  7. #7
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    The ones from Taco Bell, outside layer anyway, seem to me to be nothing more than a pita.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  8. #8
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    Thanks Gail and Sneezles!

    Hmmm, the gorditas that I've had at TB didn't seem to be made in a pita - at least they weren't like any pita I've ever had. They were very soft and pliable and were a bit thicker than a tortilla but not as thick as a pita.

    To me, pitas are a lot drier, and chewier in a tougher way with more texture (bread like). I don't know if that makes any sense.
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  9. #9

    Cool

    I'm not sure what those things are that a lot of the fast-food places use instead of regular flour tortillas. They're thick like pita and have a different texture from tortillas. If you've ever made your own flour tortillas, you'll find that they tend to have paper-thin layers (usually three) they blister and puff a bit on the griddle. Your fast food tortilla products don't have this consistency at all, so I wouldn't suggest you simply try making a flour tortilla thicker.

    If Taco Bell ISN'T using commercially made pita bread, they're making something very close to it. I suspect they're oven baked rather than cooked on a grill or comal, but beyond that I'm just not flatbread savvy enough to say. (That stuff on my post above between the word "Gordita" and the --- is a quote from someone on the web, who wasn't too familiar with American fast food, by the way.)

    Sorry I can't offer you more help.

  10. #10
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    Thanks again, Gail.

    You're right about the flour tortillas. That's why I was thinking that the gorditas were not just a thick tortilla.

    I guess I'll keep my eyes and ears open. I haven't had one in probably over a year so maybe I should try them again the next time I get into the "city".
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  11. #11
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    Wink

    I've become a big fan of the Houston Chronicle's food section since I started visiting there via sautewednesday.com.

    Today, quite coincidentally, they gave us everything we could possibly we need to know about gorditas...though I've little doubt this board could come up with more!

    http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/food/2437985

    BOB

  12. #12
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    I've bought pitas that were just like the gordita shells at Taco Bell. They are a thick pocketless pita and are sold by the deli counter with the thin pitas and other ethnic breads. Have you seen these? I use them to make sandwiches, but, in my mind, they are exactly the same as the gorditas at the Bell.

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by bobmark226
    I've become a big fan of the Houston Chronicle's food section since I started visiting there via sautewednesday.com.
    The Food Section of the Houston Chronicle is about the only thing I missed when we canceled our supscription! Will have to check out the sautewednesday.com site!
    Thanks for the link on the gorditas! I'm going to look at my pita recipe and see if I can adjust it to use for gorditas!
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  14. #14
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    Bob, thanks for the link - I'm going to go check it out!

    erin elizabeth, I haven't ever seen them in our stores. But, I live in the boonies. I think that next time I get into town I'm going to do some careful checking. Thanks for the heads up!

    sneezles, if you are able to adapt your pita recipe, please let us know. I'm really wanting the flour gorditas rather than the corn gorditas.
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

  15. #15
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    When i read this recipe last night i thought of Chocolate Rose! I had to post it for you. I checked out the "King Arthur Flour Baker's Companion: The All-Purpose Baking cookbook" from the library and now i must buy it...drat. This recipe is from this book:

    Soft Wrap Bread

    Makes 8 breads.

    We use a rather unusual method to make this bread: boiling water is added to the flour, "cooking" the starch and making the resultant dough soft and easy to roll out. In addition, precooking the starch this way eliminates any possibility of a starchy taste in the final bread; all in all, we find these wraplike rounds better tasting than conventional flour tortillas or other wraps. In texture, they're more like a Taco Bell gordita or pita bread than a tortilla, so if you like the bread in your sandwich to be a sustantial part of the whole, this is a good recipe for your files.

    3 to 3 1/4 cups (12 3/4 to 13 3/4 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour
    1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) boiling water
    1/4 cup (1 1/2 oz) potato flour or 1/2 cup (5/8 oz) potato flakes
    1 1/4 tsp. salt
    2 tbsp. vegetable oil
    1 tsp instant yeast

    Place 2 cups of the flour in a bowl. Pour the boiling water over the flour and stir until smooth. Cover the bowl and set aside to cool the mixture for 30 minutes.

    In a separate bowl, whisk together the potato flour and 1 cup of the remaining flour with the salt, oil an yeast. Add this to the cooled flour-water mixture, stir then knead for several minutes (by hand or mixer) to form a soft dough. The dough should form a ball, but will remain somewhat sticky. Add additional flour only if necessary; if kneading by hand, keep your hands and work surface lightly oiled. Place the dough in a greased bowl and let it rise, covered, for 1 hour.

    Divide the dough into 8 pieces (about the size of a handball, about 3 ounces), cover, and let rest for 15 to 30 minutes. Roll each piece into 7-to8-inch circle and dry-fry them (fry without oil) over medium-high heat for 1 to 2 minutes per side, until they're puffed and flecked with brown spots. Adjust the heat if they seem to be cooking too quickly or too slowly; cooking too quickly means they may be raw in the center, while too slowly will dry them out. Transfer the cooked breads to a wire rack, stacking them to keep them soft. Serve immediately, or cool slightly before storing in a plastic bag.

    1 bread, 98 grams: 202 cal, 4 g fat, 5 g pro, 36 g complex carbs, 2 g fiber, 336 mg sodium, 150 mg potassium, 1 mg vit C, 3 mg iron, 3 mg calcium, 55 mg phosphorus

  16. #16
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    Taco Bell makes a gordita kit(like a taco kit) with those puffy tortillas. I have also seen them near the deli counter, but check for one of those kits.

    Hmm, might have to have a cheesy gordita crunch for lunch...
    Karen

  17. #17
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    Gail is right on about the differences in what people call "gorditas" - here in NM when Taco Bell brought out their "gorditas," people laughed. Where I grew up in southern NM, a gordita is a thick, round, corn tortilla (made out of corn masa, not flour) and split so there's a "pocket" in the middle to put the fillings into. I don't know what those gargantuan, thick flour tortillas are, but they're not gorditas as I know them.

    The weird thing is that while gorditas are available everywhere in southern NM, I have never seen them on a Mexican food menu here in Albuquerque. Too bad, because they are REALLY good.

    And, to no one's surprise I'm sure, the chalupas at Taco Bell are nothing like the chalupas people serve around here in Mexican restaurants, which are flat, sometimes toasted corn tortillas, usually served with red chile meat and queso fresco on top.
    I will still never be able to stomach medleys. I either want to hear a song or not hear a song; I never want to hear part of a song.
    - Alan Light

  18. #18
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    Originally posted by sweetpea
    When i read this recipe last night i thought of Chocolate Rose! I had to post it for you
    Sweetpea, thanks so much for thinking of me and posting this!! I'm definitely going to try it. I haven't had time to do a lot of experimenting lately but my gordita craving is starting to sneak up on me again. Just the other day I was thinking that I needed to try again. Thank you!!

    Jellyben and ellamay, thanks for all the info.
    Even though the Taco Bell version isn't authentic I do like the darn things.
    "Let food be thy medicine" ~ Hippocrates

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