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Thread: Stuffed Cabbage

  1. #1
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    Aug 2003
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    Stuffed Cabbage

    Okay, I thought that there was a thread about stuffed cabbage but when I did the search nothing came up. I have the recipe, but what I was wondering, do you normally cook the meat before stuffing the cabbage? The recipe I have (Martha Stewart) doesn't say, so I stuffed them without cooking the meat.

    ARGH!!! I hope that was right. Any advice?

    Theresa

    Editing to ask, can you freeze stuffed cabbage? I think I've made way more then I need. I was just wondering. Plus I have all this left over filling and don't know wha to do with it

  2. #2
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    Aug 2002
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    I found 3 recipes for stuffed cabbage with a ground meat filling in a community type cook book and one in the Joy of Cooking, and none of them said anything about cooking the meat first. They just said to stuff the cabbage with the meat mixture, so I guess that's raw.

  3. #3
    Here's a recipe for traditional Dolmathes I got from my Greek friend's dear mother. I haven't tried it myself, but I've had hers and they're awesome. It uses the browned meat in it, and this is the way it's traiditionally made. I have no idea what Martha Stewart does though.

    1 tbsp olive oil
    2 leaves fresh mint, chopped
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 tomato, peeled and chopped
    3/4 tsp salt
    1/4 tsp pepper
    1/2 c water
    3 tbsps long-grain white rice
    1 jar grape leaves or 2 small green cabbages
    1 1/2 c beef broth
    2 tbsps butter, melted
    1 egg
    2 egg yolks
    3 tbsps lemon juice

    1. Using a large frying pan, brown meat and onion in oil. Add mint, garlic, tomato, salt, pepper, and 1/2 cup water; cover and simmer 30 minutes. Mix in the rice and remove from heat.

    2. Remove grape leaves from the jar, scald with hot water, and drain. Or blanch fresh grape leaves or cabbage leaves in boiling salted water for 1 minute; lift out with a slotted spoon and drain.

    3. Place about 1 tbsp filling at the stem end of grape of cabbage leaves, fold sides in, and rollup. Arrange in a large frying pan, seam side down. Pour the broth and melted butter over. Cover and simmer 50 minutes to 1 hour, or until rice is tender.

    4. For lemon sauce, beat together the egg, egg yolks, and lemon juice. Pour the broth from the stuffed leaves into the lemon-egg mixture and beat just until blended. Return to the pan and cook over very low heat just until the sauce is thickened.

  4. #4
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    Kara, thanks for the recipe. I've been on a mission lately for collecting and trying Greek recipes after discovering how much I like the food. I'll try this soon.

  5. #5
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    Theresa, did you freeze it?

    I have four cabbages left in my garden and lots of tomatoes. Your thread made me realize what I can do tomorrow with my veggies in addition to making the roasted tomato soup. Thanks and I will watch this thread in regards to freezing them!
    "There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats." - Albert Schweitzer

  6. #6
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    Oct 2003
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    Ohio
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    I've made stuffed cabbage many times and I don't cook the meat first. It's not necessary because for amount of time you have to bake them, or simmer in a dutch oven on top of the stove, the meat will cook.

    These freeze VERY well too. I also add a little sauerkraut, brown sugar and a little red wine to the sauce for extra flavor.

  7. #7
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    Aug 2004
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    Stuffed Cabbage

    My family has been making stuffed cabbage for years. A tradition that dates back many generations. We have several variations to our original recipe. One that uses mainly saurkraut with diced tomatoes, one with a tomato soup base and one with diced ham and tomatoes. None of the recipes requires the meat to be cooked prior to stuffing. When you bake the "pigs" (as we call them), the meat essentially is cooked by being "steamed". We always make a ton as they are time consuming and yes, they freeze nicely.

  8. #8
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    Re: Stuffed Cabbage

    Originally posted by lirpa
    My family has been making stuffed cabbage for years. A tradition that dates back many generations. We have several variations to our original recipe. One that uses mainly saurkraut with diced tomatoes, one with a tomato soup base and one with diced ham and tomatoes. None of the recipes requires the meat to be cooked prior to stuffing. When you bake the "pigs" (as we call them), the meat essentially is cooked by being "steamed". We always make a ton as they are time consuming and yes, they freeze nicely.
    Same here...we also use sauerkraut, and we also call them "pigs." (Maybe it's a Western PA thing? ). Our town is having an ethnic festival this weekend, and many of the churches are offering halupki...that's the Eastern European term for "stuffed cabbage" (not to be confused with halushki which is buttered cabbage and noodles).

  9. #9
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    I make halupki often. This was a staple growing up. I use raw meat also because they steam and I freeze leftovers,too. We put kraut and smoked sausage on top of the cabbages. Will be on the menu this month.

    Kara- how much meat is in the dolmathes? I didn't see an amount for meat.

  10. #10
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    In Polish, they are golubki, pronounced "ga-wump-ki" (as Eastern European isn't a language, the halupki is probably Slovak). Here is a recipe similar to what we do...

    Polish Stuffed Cabbage (Golubki) 2 lb. lean Ground Beef
    1/2 cup Rice uncooked
    1 medium Onion Diced
    1 Green Pepper Diced
    2 Eggs
    1 large head Cabbage
    2 qt. Tomato Juice

    PREPARE THE CABBAGE LEAVES:
    The Old timers would freeze the head solid, then peel the leaves from the head as they thawed.
    The best way is to cut the core out with a knife, then put the hole-where-the-core-was, side down in a steamer over boiling water. Let it sit for about 10 minutes and remove. Several layers of the outer leaves should be soft enough to remove from the head. When you've removed as many as you can, return the head to the steamer to soften more leaves. Take a sharp knife and remove as much of the central vein as you can.

    FILLING:
    Mix all the other ingredients together in a bowl. Work it with your hands until the eggs and other ingredients except the tomato juice are thoroughly mixed into the meat. Now, take a glob of mixture and set it in the hollow of a deveined leaf, with the end that was near the core towards you.
    Fold the end nearest you over the mix. Fold the left side over the mix and then the right side.
    Roll it up so that the "seam" is on the bottom. Place in the pan seam side down and continue with the other leaves. * When you've made the last cabbage roll, pour in the tomato juice to cover.
    Bring to a boil then simmer for AT LEAST an hour.
    Serve in a bowl with the juice, although these, like spaghetti are better the 2nd day.

    *This is an ideal cabbage roll. 3/4 of them won't go together this perfectly, so be ready to make adjustments when making the rolls.

    Variation: V8 juice can be used instead of tomato juice
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  11. #11
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    I agree--don't cook the meat beforehand and yes, they do freeze well. My DH's family made them often and now I make them, but not as often!

  12. #12
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    Thank you thank you thank you. I've had them sitting in the fridge praying that I wouldn't have to force DH to eat them all within the next two days or something. The meat turned out very cooked, thank God. And now that I know I can freeze them, I'll go buy another head and finish the filling that I already have.

    Thanks guys.
    Theresa

    PS-We call them Golupki to, it's a Polish thing

  13. #13
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    Location
    Johnstown PA
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    Yes, "halupki" is Slovak. However, if you go to a church around here, they all refer to it as "halupki," regardless of ethnic origin. Sorry about the language mistake...I am aware that "Eastern European" doesn't refer to one specific language or culture.

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