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Thread: Proper "greeting" for Ramadan?

  1. #1
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    Proper "greeting" for Ramadan?

    I *know* someone on this board will have the answer to this:

    What is the proper greeting/statement of good wishes for someone observing Ramadan?

    And, I understand that Eid marks the end of Ramadan -- what is the proper thing to say then?

    A new friend, who is Muslim, sent me lovely "New Year" wishes earlier this week for Rosh Hashanah, and I want to return the gesture when Ramadan starts next week -- but not sure what's appropriate.

    (I think there may have been an earlier thread on this topic, but I can't seem to find it ... )

    TIA!

    Helene
    "We reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our founding fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience's sake."
    --President Barack Obama, 1/20/09

  2. #2
    Hi Helene,

    I found this site - even if you don't want to send an e-greeting, you can probably get some ideas.

    http://www.123greetings.com/events/r...ous_blessings/

  3. #3
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    from a simple Google search

    62. What is the proper greeting during Ramadan?

    You may say, "Ramadan Mubarrak." You could also say, "Salaam," which means "peace" and is useful at any time. If you are planning to meet with Muslims during Ramadan, be aware that they may be fasting and a meal-time meeting may be awkward.

  4. #4
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    I was taught that "Salaam Alikum" was a proper gretting for muslims.

    As Bob said, muslims generally fast during Ramadan but the fasting only last during daylight. Once it is dark, they are free to eat.

  5. #5
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    helene,
    as bob already said, "ramadan mubarak" is the traditional greeting. that said, even though i usually say ramadan mubarak, i just called a friend to wish him a "happy ramadan"--b/c that's what i felt like saying. so, i'm sure your friend will appreciate any way you word your wishes!

    and, as far as eid goes, "eid mubarak" is the traditional greeting. my mom made a sign for us upon our return from kashmir last year (which happened to coincide with eid)--it said "blessed eid". we loved it!

    greta

  6. #6
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    No help for you on the greetings, but didn't Ramadan start a few days ago?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliKat11
    No help for you on the greetings, but didn't Ramadan start a few days ago?
    Yes, you're right, it did. Now I feel totally stupid .... on Sunday, I was talking to my friend, and she said that Ramadan starts "next week" -- and I just assumed that she meant the week of October 10 ... now I check and see that it did, indeed, start on Oct. 4.

    I'm assuming it's still not too late to send greetings, especially since Ramadan lasts for a month .... but I do feel foolish, and rude, because we exchanged e-mails a few times this week (we work together on a volunteer project), and I didn't say anything, especially after she was gracious enough to get the date of my holiday correct.

    I guess what I need is a more inclusive calendar, with a wider variety of holidays on it.


    Helene
    "We reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. Our founding fathers, faced with perils we can scarcely imagine, drafted a charter to assure the rule of law and the rights of man, a charter expanded by the blood of generations. Those ideals still light the world, and we will not give them up for expedience's sake."
    --President Barack Obama, 1/20/09

  8. #8
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    Wow--I think you're being just a little too hard on yourself!

    From what I understand, Muslim families get together to break the fast with big meals, and there are lots of parties. The three days following Ramadan (Id al Fitr), everybody takes off work, goes to parties, and gives gifts.

    Maybe you could save your greetings/gifts/whatever for Id al Fitr?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by HRJ
    I *know* someone on this board will have the answer to this:

    What is the proper greeting/statement of good wishes for someone observing Ramadan?

    And, I understand that Eid marks the end of Ramadan -- what is the proper thing to say then?
    Ramadan Kareem and

    Eid Mubarak
    Linda

    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left and I could say “I used everything you gave me.”

    Erma Bombeck

  10. #10
    I thought that it's just possible to say "Happy Ramadan", but I see that there is some special greeting It's nice of you that you want to find it out, you are a true friend, buddy!

  11. #11
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    olchik, it IS possible to say "happy ramadan"...the muslims i know would be pleased with any type of acknowledgement--it doesn't necessarily need to be culturally correct.

    linda's post reminds me that the greeting will differ depending on whether a person is of arab origin, south asian, etc. people in kashmir don't use kareem (as a general rule).

    complicated, huh?!!?

  12. #12
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    Ah, thanks Greta, that's a fact I didn't know since the Muslims of my acquaintance are largely of Arab origin and the ones that aren't I met while we were all together in an Arab country observing the local customs.
    Linda

    When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left and I could say “I used everything you gave me.”

    Erma Bombeck

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