Community Message Boards
Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Canned Pumpkin: did you know....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Un-American NY
    Posts
    8,611

    Question Canned Pumpkin: did you know....

    I didn't, but according to Michael Chiarello on his Halloween episode, canned pumpkin is actually Blue Hubbard squash?

    Curious.

    Bob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    396
    I was curious about this so I did a little research, and since Libby's states clearly on their label that they use 100% pure pumpkin, I wanted to see what it was about, they state they use the Dickinson pumpkin and I found this info about it so it might be where Michael gets the idea of that.

    "These varieties are seldom, if ever, grown outside the pumpkin-processing areas. Their appearance resembles that of a large butternut or other oblong squash. The original variety is Dickinson, as mentioned. This pumpkin was first processed in 1929 when the rights to the Dickinson pumpkin were acquired by the Libby Co. They have since made some of their own selections, but the pumpkin is virtually unchanged in over 60 years. These ugly and misshapen specimens don't make good harvest displays or jack-o'-lanterns, but they do make the best desserts."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    11,081
    Interesting. I didn't know that.

    Peggy
    To take the first step in faith, you don't have to see the whole staircase: just take the first step. - Dr. Martin Luther King

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Un-American NY
    Posts
    8,611
    Quote Originally Posted by LLR
    "These varieties are seldom, if ever, grown outside the pumpkin-processing areas. Their appearance resembles that of a large butternut or other oblong squash. The original variety is Dickinson, as mentioned. This pumpkin was first processed in 1929 when the rights to the Dickinson pumpkin were acquired by the Libby Co. They have since made some of their own selections, but the pumpkin is virtually unchanged in over 60 years. These ugly and misshapen specimens don't make good harvest displays or jack-o'-lanterns, but they do make the best desserts."
    Interesting, because MC specifically remarked that "real" pumpkin is much sweeter than what's in the can, which is why he used a real one for the recipe he was doing. I don't know that I've ever seen any other brand of canned pumpkin other than Libby's. Has anyone else?

    The other thing is that it was predicted that because of some weather element, Libby's crop was bad and that prices would be high this year. I just bought a half dozen cans for 99 cents, which is, of course, less than I paid in the city at 1.29 or so. Is anyone else seeing any increases?

    My (new) neighboring organic shop has at least five different varieties of pumpkin, several of which I've never seen. I'm looking forward to experimenting with some of these. Anyone know or grow any odd types they like?

    Bob

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,662
    I have seen other brands of canned pumpkin, but usually it is Libby's and a store brand. I do see a bit of a difference, so I don't think they are processed the same and slapped with a different label.

    I haven't grown any -- bought seeds and had to plant them after the summer veggies, got busy and forgot. Will try next year. I used to work with someone who always sought out the Blue Hubbard squash at a local farmer's market for her "pumpkin pie" each year. She said they were nearly the same, but she like the Hubbard better. I think she said it was sweeter.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    2,861
    I just got a buttercup squash in my organic delivery yesterday, but I have never tried or even seen one of them before. When I just looked up buttercup squash online, none of the pictures actually look like it. It actually looks more like this one (turban squash), except it is light green on top and dark green on the bottom. Maybe I got a mutant buttercup?


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    Lexington, Ky.
    Posts
    1,086
    I had heard from a farmer at the market that most canned pumpkin was acutally butternut squash. I also read that in From Amaranth to Zucchini; Vegetables from A to Z I believe.

    I was trying to sort all this out recently and read in the same book that Australian pumpkins--many of which are greenish or grayish, with strong lines down the sides--are among the tastiest or best to use in recipes. I have heard the same about pink banana squash, which I just like saying and seeing! I have one at home on the counter, but haven't put it to use yet.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    6,729
    I've hear people talk about the little sugar pumpkins being the ones that are good for pies instead of the "tasteless" jack o lantern pumpkins. Martha is the one that I remember being so adament about that. I've used both, but by the time I added sugar and spices I couldn't tell a difference.

    I have never seen a blue Hubbard squash...and I've seen some strange squashes. I'm a little afraid to try weird squashes. I think it stems from my fear of sweet potatoes and yams because I come from the land of candied and marshmalloed.
    If loving me is wrong, you don't want to be right.

    Don't touch the hair!
    JB

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by bobmark226
    I don't know that I've ever seen any other brand of canned pumpkin other than Libby's. Has anyone else?
    I just got home from Whole Foods and saw some organic canned pumpkin in the baking aisle. I did not pay attention to the price, just made a mental note of it for the next time I needed to buy canned pumpkin.

    I prefer fresh pumpkin to canned anyday!!!! I buy a lot of pumpkins this time of year and puree and freeze them in 1 cup bags.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Arlington, WA
    Posts
    5,648
    We grow a couple kinds of squash each year. Blue hubbard is huge, maybe 20-30 pounds each, with a thick layer of bright orange "inside stuff" to use. They are sort of lumpy-round in shape with a pale blue-gray-green color. Stores usually sell them chopped up into chunks and wrapped in plastic. I use it anytime a recipe calls for canned pumpkin, especially in pie, muffins, sweet bread, or soup.
    I chop a whole squash & bake it in chunks, scrape out the flesh into 1 lb containers and freeze. I like butternut but they're smaller than hubbards so I mostly use them for roasting and eating immediately rather than freezing.

    Squashes vary from year to year. some years are sweeter than others. but I think almost any winter squash could be substituted for canned pumpkin. I've read that the pumpkins sold at halloween are not good for cooking but I've never tried. I know a hubbard squash has a much thicker layer of orange flesh than any pumpkin I've ever seen. But as to the question of what is in the libby's can, I don't really know.
    "If the world were a logical place, men would ride side saddle." Rita Mae Brown

  11. #11

    pumpkin

    We had our cooking light dinner here last Friday night and I carved a regular pumpkin which I then used as the wine bucket.....one of the girls in our group wanted to cook a pumpkin and I told her to take mine home and cook it as I would toss it. She forgot to take the pumpkin and so I ended up baking it and making pumpkin pies yesterday. Honestly I could not really taste a difference in the fresh pumpkin or the one in the cans. I think it may be a tad sweeter and perhaps lighter after I baked it but honestly I will stick with Libby's in the can. Now I can say I made it from scratch just once

  12. #12
    Re: "I've read that the pumpkins sold at Halloween are not good for cooking but I've never tried."

    Think about it -- that pumpkin just doesn't have any idea about when it is sold!

    I buy fresh pumpkins whenever they become available, and that is most often near the end of October.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    SW Pennsylvania
    Posts
    4,583
    Quote Originally Posted by oceanjasper
    I just got a buttercup squash in my organic delivery yesterday, but I have never tried or even seen one of them before. When I just looked up buttercup squash online, none of the pictures actually look like it. It actually looks more like this one (turban squash), except it is light green on top and dark green on the bottom. Maybe I got a mutant buttercup?

    check out this website:
    http://www.hormel.com/templates/temp...mid=120&id=830

    I'm posting it under a separate thread, as well, since it's contains lots of info.
    Vicci


    Can't you just eat what I put in front of you? Do you have to know what it is?
    Ria Parkinson, Butterflies (BBC, 1978-83)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    2,861
    Thanks, Vicci. It is pretty amazing how many different types of squash/pumpkin there are! I decided to take a photo of my mutant buttercup.


  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Lone Star State
    Posts
    20,662
    I wonder if yours is a different variety or the same variety picked green?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Posts
    2,861
    Hi Beth,

    I feel bad now for going so far off of Bob's topic, but I really was curious! I did find a website that mentioned the turban squash could come in a variety of colours including green, so that is what I think it is. Apparently, the turban squash is a larger variety of the buttercup. Learned something new! Now, I need to find a recipe to use it up!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Madison, WI USA
    Posts
    7,851
    CoffeeQueen - why do you prefer fresh over canned so much?? I'm curious to know what the taste/texture is. Also, what are you using the pumpkin for (for example, is fresh preferred for some recipes while canned is fine for others?)

    Interesting factoids about canned pumpkin.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •