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Thread: Substitute for cream of tartar in baking?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Substitute for cream of tartar in baking?

    I started making some Lemon Cookies this morning, and realized I don't have any Cream of Tartar. The recipe calls for 1 1/2 teaspoons; I'm cutting the recipe in half so I would only need 3/4 teaspoon. Do the baking wizards out there know if there's anything I can sub for this? TIA. Martha

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    sunny Florida
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    According to the Cook's thesaurus.......

    cream of tartar = potassium acid tartrate = potassium bitartrate Substitutes: lemon juice (use 3 times as much) OR vinegar (use 3 times as much)

    Hope that helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    There is no acceptable substitute -- I confirmed by googling

    Question:

    If you don't have cream of tartar is there a substitute? I am baking snickerdoodle cookies. - Christine Elgin (7/17/01)



    Answers:

    The answer is, there is not a good substitution. If cream of tartar is used along with baking soda in a cake or cookie recipe, omit both and use baking powder instead. If it calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

    Normally, when cream of tartar is used in a cookie, it is used together with baking soda. The two of them combined work like double-acting baking powder. When substituting for cream of tartar, you must also substitute for the baking soda. If your recipe calls for baking soda and cream of tarter, I would just use baking powder.

    One teaspoon baking powder is equivalent to 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar. If there is additional baking soda that does not fit into the equation, simply add it to the batter.

  4. #4
    I was just getting ready to post the same thing Sister said. Lemon should be fine in your cookies, though you may need to compensate with a little more sugar & flour.

    A white, powdered substance, also referred to as potassium salt, that is the residue (by-product) from the tartaric acid remaining in wine casks after the fermented grapes have been removed. Cream of tartar is a key ingredient added to baking soda in order to produce baking powder. It is also often added to egg whites to stabilize the whites as they are beaten and then folded into cake batters and for use in preparing meringues. Similarly, cream of tartar is useful in the preparation of sugar syrups to prevent them from crystallizing.

    Last edited by dorothyntototoo; 01-03-2006 at 09:24 AM. Reason: More info
    Dorothy aka Martha

    Somewhere over the rainbow...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    Thanks for all the replies. I think I can make it work somehow!

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