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Thread: Partially Deboned Quail?? How??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Northern California
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    Partially Deboned Quail?? How??

    Tonight at our Supper Club Dinner we are making the CL Blackberry-Zinfandel Quail recipe. The recipe calls for "partially deboned quail". I asked the meat shop where I bought them about this and they said the quail didn't come that way and they had no idea what that meant or how it was done. Plus the quail I ordered came in frozen so I had to take them home as is.

    Does anyone know how to partially debone a quail???

    Peggy
    To take the first step in faith, you don't have to see the whole staircase: just take the first step. - Dr. Martin Luther King

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Texas
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    24,226
    Never done it myself but did find this for you over at eGullet:

    Semi-deboning (clearing out the cavity, but leaving the legs and wings intact) is decidedly the way to go. I'm sure I could bone out the limbs as well, if I really needed to, but I'd need to have a long walk and a stiff drink afterwards.

    I grabbed quail on impulse for an in-class cooking competition at school. The first one took me about fifteen minutes, the second eight, and the third (and ensuing) about four or five minutes each. I started by cutting out the backbone with a sharp knifetip (shears would be good, too). Then, opening the bird up, I broke the wishbone with my fingers and cut it out. Follow the wishbone down to the shoulder blades, and sever that at the joint where it joins the wing. Run the tip of your knife down either side of the keelbone, and pull it up with your fingers. Cut the breast meat away from it as you lift gently.

    If you have a thin, flexible boning knife, you can slide it beneath the ribs quite easily to cut them away; much like cutting away the ribs of a salmon side. After that it's just a matter of running a fingertip gingerly around the cavity to check for any missed bones; and then rolling the wee beastie back into shape around your filling of choice.

    This is probably not the canonical way to do it, but it works.

    As with any piece of delicate work, a sharp knife is *really* important. I prefer a flexible boning knife for delicate work, a shorter stiff one for heavier pieces. When you are sharpening a boning knife, pay special attention to the tip where the blade curves. This is your "fingertip", and with a delicate touch you'll feel the bones just as well with the knife as you do with your finger.
    Well-behaved women seldom make history!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    11,081
    Thank you so much!!! I had tried a search on answers.com but couldn't find anything that gave the instructions. This looks like a job for my DH!

    Peggy
    To take the first step in faith, you don't have to see the whole staircase: just take the first step. - Dr. Martin Luther King

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