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Thread: Roasting the turkey carcass?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    Roasting the turkey carcass?

    Someone on another forum mentioned that if you roast the turkey carcass with veggies and water before making it into soup that it really improves the stock's flavour.

    Does anyone here do that first?

    Could you tell me how exactly you do it?

    TIA.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Paulden, AZ
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    Yes, kima, I roast the carcass all the time. I haven't ever roasted the veggies before, but that's a good idea. I simply put all the turkey bones in the roasting pan, and roast it in the oven at 450 degrees until everything is a nice dark brown (usually about a half hour or so, I think!). It really gives a lot of depth of flavor to the stock. Then I usually just put the roaster on the stove, add water or chicken broth, assorted veggies, seasonings, and let it simmer away for an hour or two. Hope this helps.
    Marilyn

  3. #3
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    Jan 2001
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    Thanks-I have to try this.

    You strip the meat off after the roasting right?
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  4. #4
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    Apr 2003
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    I would leave any remaining meat on the carcass if you aren't planning to eat it. Just adds flavour to the broth.
    Understand, when you eat meat, that something did die. You have an obligation to value it - not just the sirloin but also all those wonderful tough little bits.
    Anthony Bourdain

  5. #5
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    Jan 2001
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    Thanks Linda. After I wrote that I thought about what I usually do which is exactly what you wrote.

    Here is a recipe from Earthbound Farms that will will serve as a template for the soup I make.

    Roast Turkey Vegetable Soup
    Roasting the turkey bones along with aromatic vegetables adds incredible depth of flavor and color to this soup. First you make a brown turkey stock to which you then add vegetables, herbs, pasta or rice. Don't let leftover turkey or the turkey carcass go to waste when you can make another delicious meal- now or later! The stock can be made and frozen for up to three months, then turned into soup at a future date. If you don't have any leftover turkey, the soup is still delicious and flavorful with just vegetables, thanks to the brown turkey stock base.

    Serves 6




    Brown Turkey Stock

    1 turkey carcass with any bones, meat and skin removed

    2 yellow onions, cut into 8 pieces each

    2 large carrots, cut into 1-inch lengths

    2 stalks celery, cut into 1-inch lengths

    1 bay leaf

    3 sprigs fresh thyme

    12 - 15 parsley stems

    1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns




    Soup

    1 large carrot, cut in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 1/4-inch slices

    2 stalks celery, sliced 1/4-inch thick

    1 small fennel bulb, cored, cut in half and sliced 1/4-inch thick

    1 leek, cut in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 1/4-inch slices

    1 cup green beans, cut into 1-inch lengths

    1/2 cup orzo pasta (uncooked)

    2 small zucchini, cut in half lengthwise, then crosswise into 1/4-inch slices

    3 cups cubed cooked turkey, optional

    Salt, to taste

    Freshly ground pepper, to taste



    Preheat the oven to 400 F. Place the turkey carcass and bones in a roasting pan and place in the oven. Roast for 45 minutes, then add the onions, carrots and celery to the pan. Cook until the vegetables and bones begin to brown, 30 to 45 minutes.


    Transfer the contents of the roasting pan to a large stock pot. Add cold water to completely cover the bones and bring to a simmer over high heat. Add the bay leaf, thyme sprigs, parsley and peppercorns, and reduce the heat to a setting that will maintain a slow simmer. Cook the stock for 4 hours, adding more water if the level drops below the bones and vegetables. Let cool for 30 minutes, then strain the stock through a colander or sieve, pressing on the solids to extract all the liquid. Discard the contents of the colander. At this point you can continue with the soup recipe, or cool the stock and refrigerate, covered, for up to 5 days or freeze.


    Return the stock to a large Dutch oven or 4-quart pan. Add the carrots and cook the soup over medium heat for 10 minutes. Add the celery, fennel, and leeks and cook for 5 minutes. Add the green beans and orzo pasta and raise the heat to medium-high. Cook for 5 minutes, then add the cubed turkey and the zucchini. Continue cooking until the pasta and zucchini are tender, about 5 minutes.


    Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve hot
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    9
    Hi there. I am not a big turkey roaster - but I do roast chicken carcus for making soup. I guess the concept is the same. It does give the stock greater flavour. I some times add some fresh vegetables to the roasting pan along with some herbs and a head of garlic. I use the garlic puree in the soup and some times use the veges either in the soup or in the stock. I usually intentionally roast 'extra' veges for using in the soup.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    493
    I roast my bones and veggies all the time. It makes for a darker stock (brown in color), but the flavour is amazing. I throw the bones, onions, garlic, celery and carrots in a roaster, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with crushed peppercorns and roast at about 450 for 45 minutes, or until everything is nicely browned. Then put it on the burner, add water, any necessary spices/herbs and simmer for about 20 mins.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
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    Thanks for the advice and encouragement to roast the turkey carcass before making the stock. I did it and have to say it made the best stock- a lovely dark brown, aromatic broth. It is so easy and yet made a huge difference.
    You can teach an old cook new tricks.
    You think you're not ever going to be able to eat another thing, but alas, you will find yourself feeling strangely peckish around teatime. The more you eat, the more you want. That's the way it goes."

    Nigella Lawson

  9. #9
    Do you think the "roasting" would lose anything if you froze the carcass first and then roasted and made stock at a convenient time in the future?

  10. #10
    I often freeze a turkey carcass and roast in the future. I have had no problem with it whatsoever. The basic recipe I use is from CL and it's called Rich Turkey Broth. I think it is from about 2004.

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