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Thread: Melting White Chocolate\Candy Melts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Melting White Chocolate\Candy Melts

    I would love to make some peppermint bark this year to give out as gifts to friends but I have a couple of questions. What I wanted to do was do one layer of chocolate, then on top a layer of white chocolate and then sprinkle crushed peppermint on top of that. I have great experience melting dark chocolate, but not white, mine always clumps on me or never really melts. So what I was thinking is using white candy melts instead of the white chocolate. Do you think this will work? Also what if I were to add shortening or veg oil to the white chocolate? I heard that helps it melt and also adds shine.
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Emeryville, CA
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    Are you using white chocolate chips or "quality" chocolate in brick form? We've been making this recipe for awhile and it is a must have around here...



    Layered Peppermint Crunch Bark
    From Bon Appétit

    17 ounces high quality white chocolate, finely chopped
    6 ounces peppermint candy canes, crushed
    7 ounces high quality bittersweet chocolate
    5 1/2 tablespoons whipping cream
    3/4 teaspoon peppermint extract

    Turn large baking sheet bottom side up. Cover securely with foil. Mark 12
    x 9-inch rectangle on foil. Stir white chocolate in metal bowl set over
    saucepan of barely simmering water (do not allow bottom of bowl to touch
    water) until chocolate is melted and smooth and candy thermometer
    registers 110°F. (chocolate will feel warm to touch). Remove from over
    water. Pour 2/3 cup melted white chocolate onto rectangle on foil. Using
    icing spatula, spread chocolate to fill rectangle. Sprinkle with 1/4 cup
    crushed peppermints. Chill until set, about 15 minutes.

    Stir bittersweet chocolate, cream and peppermint extract in heavy medium
    saucepan over medium-low heat until just melted and smooth. Cool to barely
    lukewarm, about 5 minutes. Pour bittersweet chocolate mixture in long
    lines over white chocolate rectangle. Using icing spatula, spread
    bittersweet chocolate in even layer. Refrigerate until very cold and firm,
    about 25 minutes.

    Rewarm remaining white chocolate in bowl set over barely simmering water
    to 110°F. Working quickly, pour white chocolate over firm bittersweet
    chocolate layer; spread to cover. Immediately sprinkle with remaining
    crushed peppermints. Chill just until firm, about 20 minutes. If you let the bark go much
    longer than this - it will be very hard to cut neatly.

    Lift foil with bark onto work surface; trim edges. Cut bark crosswise into
    2-inch-wide strips. Using metal spatula, slide bark off foil and onto work
    surface. Cut each strip crosswise into 3 sections and each section
    diagonally into 2 triangles.
    Joe

    Pictures and recipes of our Cooking and Baking!
    http://desertculinary.blogspot.com/

    Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands - and then eat just one of the pieces. ~Judith Viorst

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Seminole, FL
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    I've used both Toll House and Ghiradelli White chocolate chips, I like these because I don't have to do any chopping. None of them have melted much for me though. I don't have the double broiler over boiling water either so I don't know what it could be.
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ USA
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    chocolate chips are different than blocks of white chocolate. Chips are designed to get soft and retain their shape. The recipe above calls for white chocolate blocks. You can buy chopped white chocolate but I think you need to go to speciality stores.

    I've used candy melts for bark before and they work great. so much easier. If you have problesm with over heating it, add some crystals (there's a correct name for these but can't remember off hand - they help with the clumping but will make the end product a little softer). With melts I just use the microwave and then place my glass bowl on a heating pad while I work with it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Appleton, WI
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    4,635
    Quote Originally Posted by patissac
    I have great experience melting dark chocolate, but not white, mine always clumps on me or never really melts. So what I was thinking is using white candy melts instead of the white chocolate. Do you think this will work? Also what if I were to add shortening or veg oil to the white chocolate? I heard that helps it melt and also adds shine.
    The last time I tried melting white chips for a drizzle it clumped up on me, so I added a tiny drizzle of milk to the white chocolate and stirred it together. It came together and became workable, and worked great for a drizzle. I'm not so sure this would work as well for a bark, but it may be worth a shot to be able to use the chips.
    Merry: I don't think he knows about second breakfast, Pip.
    Pippin: What about elevenses? Luncheon? Afternoon tea? Dinner? Supper? He knows about them, doesn't he?


    I'm food bloggin' almost daily at Tummy Treasure!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Seminole, FL
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    I would have never guessed to use milk to help melt it! Thanks for the idea.

    I however, will be sticking to the candy melts then. I've never used them before but I need something that is quick and doesn't fail on me. Thanks Dana. I wonder do you think you can melt the candies in a crock pot? This would eliminate the heat pad then. One less thing to clean as well!
    I love cooking with wine sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ USA
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    2,300
    not sure about the crock pot - I think it would be too hot. If you're making bark you don't really need the heating pad because you melt and then pour. I use the heating pad when I'm making multiple pads or doing individual things like pretzels or molds. You can also use a warming plate but on the lowest setting. I would just microwave it (I do 40 seconds, stir and then 20-40 depending on how melted they are) and then pour. If they get too cold, reheat in microwave for 10-20 seconds. White seems to melt faster than milk and dark so be careful.

    Use a brand other than Wilton if you can find them - they taste much better. I usually use Merkins.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Chicago
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    I think you are overcooking it. When I melt chips I microwave it and STIR. The chips will retain their shape for some time but stirring will get the consistency you require for the bark.

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